Land slippage near the CRD Central Cariboo Transfer Station above the Williams Lake River Valley severed power to the city’s lagoon system last weekend. (Scott Nelson photo)

Land slippage near the CRD Central Cariboo Transfer Station above the Williams Lake River Valley severed power to the city’s lagoon system last weekend. (Scott Nelson photo)

Land slippage cuts power to Williams Lake sewer lagoons, back-up generator providing power

The slide was discovered last weekend

Land slippage near the Central Cariboo Transfer Station in Williams Lake last weekend impacted some infrastructure around the city’s sewer lagoon system.

“Power was lost to the lagoon system but we have a back-up generator,” said Erick Peterson, the city’s director of protective services, during the city council meeting Tuesday, June 21.

The city is working with the province to try to look at solutions – long-term and short-term, he noted, adding the electrical line that was lost due to the slide may not be able to go back in the same location.

“There could be an expense associated with getting full-time power back.”

A geotechnical report on the site is expected on Wednesday, June 22, Peterson said.

On June 2, the city activated its emergency operations centre at level one and declared a state of local emergency so it could respond to an identified increased water load at a historic beaver dam site high above Juniper Street off Lakeside Drive.

Water levels have been reduced and the city is now working to hand the project back to the province because the area is on Crown land, Peterson said.

“It should be their responsibility to take over it now that the emergency has been mitigated.”

Gary Muraca, the city’s chief administrative officer, said the city is getting a legal opinion and is sending a letter to the province about issue.

READ MORE: Williams Lake EOC still monitoring increased water levels at historic beaver dam



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