Leap Day, on Feb. 29, only happens every four years. (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)

Leap Year means we get an extra day in February, so how are you spending it?

People online have a number of suggestions and plans on how they will be spending Saturday

It never seems like there is enough time to get everything done. But this year we get an extra day, so how are you going to spend it?

A Leap Year falls every four years and contains an additional day in order to keep the calendar year synchronized with the Earth’s rotation around the sun. The extra day falls on Feb. 29, while non-Leap Years only include 28 days in February.

Exactly how to use the extra day is a question taking social media by storm and, as always, people have some ideas.

Historically, some people have used the extra 24 hours to reach new records and make headlines. For instance, Gordie Howe used the day in 1980 to become the first NHL player to score 800 career goals. Former Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau announced he would be retiring on Leap Day in 1984.

But for the rest of us, the day will likely not involve making history. Instead, a number of outdoor groups suggest walking and exploring the great outdoors.

On the other hand, many social media users have said they plan to sleep and rest. Others are pledging not to be lazy or binge-watch online streaming services, and instead make the 24 hours “meaningful” whether that be to focus on self-care or unplugging from technology.

As for the five million people in the world born on Leap Day, they’ll likely be taking the opportunity to celebrate their birthday, on their actual birth date. That includes Superman, who was born on Feb. 29, according to DC Comics.

Others say they don’t plan on making any plans or commitments until March 1.

How are you going to spend Leap Day?


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Holidays

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Cariboo real estate sales stall, decline due to struggling resource industries, COVID-19

Sales down in every Cariboo city over the same time last year

Keeping B.C. together while staying apart, Royal BC Museum creates webinar series

Museum and archives responds to COVID-19 with online programs for all ages

Williams Lake city council to meet by teleconferencing due to COVID-19

Williams Lake city council will be holding its meetings by teleconference during… Continue reading

‘Keeping workers safe is crucial in times of COVID-19’: Hospital Employees’ Union

Cannot fight a virus without housekeeping in hospitals, care homes, said Jennifer Whiteside

VIDEO: ‘Used gloves and masks go in the garbage,’ says irked B.C. mayor

Health officials have said single-use gloves won’t do much to curb the spread of COVID-19

General exposure to public low after inmate tests positive for COVID-19: Interior Health

The Okanagan Correctional Centre inmate is receiving appropriate care

Sex workers face new risks during COVID-19 pandemic

‘Desperation has kicked in’ for vulnerable, undocumented workers unable to access help

Unclear if Cowichan couple refusing to self-isolate will face penalty

No fines or charges have been laid to date, including Cowichan couple who won’t self isolate

Sinclar Group curtailing all sawmill operations temporarily

Nechako Lumber, Apollo Forest Products and Lakeland Mills to be curtailed for three weeks starting April 5.

COVID-19: Postponed surgeries will be done, B.C. health minister says

Contract with private surgical clinic to help clear backlog

Black Press Media ad sparks discussion about value of community newspapers

White Rock resident hopes front-page note shines light on revenue loss during COVID-19 crisis

Don’t stop going to the doctor, just do it virtually: B.C. association

Doctors encourage patients to access telephone, online visits

Most Read