British Columbia provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry arrives for a news conference regarding the novel coronavirus COVID-19, in Vancouver, on Saturday, March 14, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C.’s top doctor details prescription for safe long weekend

Yes, it includes hosting an online cooking show

B.C.’s top doctor says she is confident most people are following social contact protocols that are in place to minimize the spread of COVID-19. But just in case, Dr. Bonnie Henry shared her prescription for keeping things safe and fun during the upcoming Easter long weekend.

“Let’s make this a weekend to unwind, but to be kind,” Henry said during a news conference on Thursday (April 9). “It’s a weekend for us to stay at home and appreciate what we have.”

A few of Henry’s suggestions included:

  • Offering to tidy your elderly neighbours garden
  • Drop off food
  • Host your own cooking show online
  • Stream a movie with a friend
  • Have a virtual 7 p.m. block party
  • Sit in the sun and read a book
  • Go for a bike ride, or walk in the sun – but keep your distance

B.C. announced 34 more confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus on Thursday, as well as two more deaths, bringing the total number of active confirmed cases to 462.

“The number of cases tells me people are doing what they’re being asked to do,” Henry said.

This long weekend marks the first holiday in B.C. while the province is under a number of provincial and federal orders, including a ban on events larger than 50 guests, as well as mandatory self-isolation for 14 days for those arriving from overseas and the U.S. Provincial parks have been shut down, while restaurants are limited to take-out and delivery services only.

Health officials are urging the public not to travel this long weekend.

READ MORE: COVID-19 death toll reaches 50 in B.C., while daily case count steadies

“Now is not the time for travel unless it is absolutely necessary and you need to take care of your family,” Henry said. “There’s lots that we can do close to home, with our family, with the people we live with, with our close circle of friends.”

Because there is no vaccine or cure for COVID-19, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are particularly at risk of seeing adverse impacts if they contract the virus.

On Thursday, as Canada surpassed 20,000 cases nationwide, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said during a news conference that normal life won’t return fully until a vaccine is developed.

Henry admitted that “we are going to have a bumpy ride for awhile,” and added that it’s more important than ever to maintain physical distancing measures in the weeks ahead.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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