flooding

A state of emergency remains in effect for the Williams Lake River Valley and WLIB Tillion Reserve #4 (WLIB photo)

River valley flooding destroys archaeological sites, uncovers others

Sugarcane Archaeology was issued an emergency permit earlier this month

A state of emergency remains in effect for the Williams Lake River Valley and WLIB Tillion Reserve #4 (WLIB photo)
Xat’sull First Nation natural resource co-ordinator Mike Stinson and Chief Sheri Sellars took part in a helicopter tour of the Williams Creek river valley recently to see first hand the impact of recent flooding. (Photo submitted)
Xat’sull First Nation natural resource co-ordinator Mike Stinson and Chief Sheri Sellars took part in a helicopter tour of the Williams Creek river valley recently to see first hand the impact of recent flooding. (Photo submitted)
Dawson Road Maintenance crews continue to work on the Soda Creek Road at the 15 km in anticipation of opening the road this weekend. (Dawson Road Maintenance photo)

Cariboo MOTI, contractors continue repair of 218 flood-impacted sites

Workers are making progress and preparing for high altitude snow melt

Dawson Road Maintenance crews continue to work on the Soda Creek Road at the 15 km in anticipation of opening the road this weekend. (Dawson Road Maintenance photo)
Sunny weather and above normal temperatures are in the forecast this weekend by Environment Canada. (Photo submitted)
Sunny weather and above normal temperatures are in the forecast this weekend by Environment Canada. (Photo submitted)
Crews continued to work in the river valley Wednesday to install a temporary pump. (Wayne Peterson photo)
Crews continued to work in the river valley Wednesday to install a temporary pump. (Wayne Peterson photo)
The front page of the Williams Lake Tribune’s April 28, 1965 edition shows that flooding was extreme that year as well as a truck and trailer knocked out the last remaining road link over the Deep Creek Bridge which had been compromised by flooding. (Williams Lake Tribune archives)

Editorial: Flooding history in Williams Lake area

Similar to 2020, flooding in 1965 impacted the City’s sewage infrastructure

The front page of the Williams Lake Tribune’s April 28, 1965 edition shows that flooding was extreme that year as well as a truck and trailer knocked out the last remaining road link over the Deep Creek Bridge which had been compromised by flooding. (Williams Lake Tribune archives)
Crews continue to install a temporary bridge to access the grit removal building in the river valley. (Gary Muraca photo)

River valley crews to install temporary bridge to access grit removal building

By Thursday it is hoped only 100 per cent treated effluent will be discharged

Crews continue to install a temporary bridge to access the grit removal building in the river valley. (Gary Muraca photo)
Crews are working to build a temporary bridge berm to access the grit removal plant, seen here at the far end of the lagoon, in the river valley. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Crews are working to build a temporary bridge berm to access the grit removal plant, seen here at the far end of the lagoon, in the river valley. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Williams Lake Indian Band continues to grapple with flooding damage to its water infrastructure after Borland Creek began to breach its original course two weekends ago. Here is an aerial view taken Tuesday, April 28. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

WLIB works to address localized flooding

Efforts continue to install a temporary waterline after the original was destroyed by raging flood waters

Williams Lake Indian Band continues to grapple with flooding damage to its water infrastructure after Borland Creek began to breach its original course two weekends ago. Here is an aerial view taken Tuesday, April 28. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
(Robert Brunet photo)

Aerial photos shows flooding at Tsq’escenemc (Canim Lake) main reserve

The photos were captured by aerial photographer and owner of Canim Lake General Store, Robert Brunet on April 30

(Robert Brunet photo)
Historic flooding tests City infrastructure

Historic flooding tests City infrastructure

An evacuation order remains in place for 11 industrial properties on Frizzi Road

Historic flooding tests City infrastructure
Williams Lake crews and contractors continue to try and gain access to repair a broken sewer line in the river valley as seen here Tuesday. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Williams Lake contractors armour sewer lagoon, averting potential large sewer breach

City’s municipal director confident work will hold, restoring power to lagoons next effort

Williams Lake crews and contractors continue to try and gain access to repair a broken sewer line in the river valley as seen here Tuesday. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Bridge Creek flooding near Houseman Road as seen late on April 29. (Martina Dopf photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

People need to stay away from all waterway banks in the Cariboo region: CRD Chair

Margo Wagner said most river and creek banks have been undermined

Bridge Creek flooding near Houseman Road as seen late on April 29. (Martina Dopf photo - 100 Mile Free Press)
Crews complete work to divert Borland Creek back to its original flow bed near Pigeon Road in 150 Mile House on Tuesday, April 28. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Crews complete work to divert Borland Creek back to its original flow bed near Pigeon Road in 150 Mile House on Tuesday, April 28. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
High water levels have wiped out sections of road and exposed sewer pipes in the Williams Lake River Valley. (Milo MacDonald photo)
High water levels have wiped out sections of road and exposed sewer pipes in the Williams Lake River Valley. (Milo MacDonald photo)
City of Williams Lake director of municipal services, Gary Muraca, surveys the latest damaged caused by flooding in the Williams Lake River Valley Monday, April 27. (Milo MacDonald photo)

City of Williams Lake: Residents urged to continue reducing water use

City releases more information around river valley situation

City of Williams Lake director of municipal services, Gary Muraca, surveys the latest damaged caused by flooding in the Williams Lake River Valley Monday, April 27. (Milo MacDonald photo)
City of Williams Lake officials face challenges in the week ahead as extremely high water levels ravage the river valley. (Scott Nelson photo)

Out of control: High water volume wreaking havoc on Williams Lake sewer system

City asks residents to moderate water usage as broken line spills partially treated effluent

City of Williams Lake officials face challenges in the week ahead as extremely high water levels ravage the river valley. (Scott Nelson photo)
Drone view of Rose Lake Ranch. (Phillip Hartmann photo)

Cariboo ranchers don hip waders to work in flooded fields

Water levels are historical for the 127 year-old ranch

Drone view of Rose Lake Ranch. (Phillip Hartmann photo)
Six more properties in the vicinity of Hawkes Creek and the Likely Road have been put on an evacuation alert as of Sunday, April 26. (Regan Marklinger photo)
Six more properties in the vicinity of Hawkes Creek and the Likely Road have been put on an evacuation alert as of Sunday, April 26. (Regan Marklinger photo)
Rose Lake Ranch owner Ingemar Kallman goes out to feed the cattle in flooded fields as unprecedented spring melt continues in the Cariboo region. (Loreen McCarvill photo)

Rose Lake ranchers don hip waders to work in flooded fields

Water levels are historical for the 127 year-old ranch

Rose Lake Ranch owner Ingemar Kallman goes out to feed the cattle in flooded fields as unprecedented spring melt continues in the Cariboo region. (Loreen McCarvill photo)