First Nations

A new banner was unveiled Monday, June 21, in Williams Lake that will hang across Oliver Street. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Orange Shirt Banner Project unveiled in Williams Lake

The Every Child Matters - 215 banner will hang across the city’s main street

 

Danielle Gilpin is the chief emergency planning co-ordinator for the Tsilhqot’in National Government’s emergency operations centre. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

TNG partners with other groups for Indigenous Peoples Day

A chili and bannock lunch was hosted in Williams Lake

 

Sugar Cane Archaeology archaeologists Tina Herd, left, and Whitney Spearing, title and rights manager for Williams Lake First Nation. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Archaeological assessments underway at Cariboo Memorial Hospital expansion site

Sugar Cane Archaeology testing green space and corner of parking lot

 

Little Chiefs Primary School students help plant 215 marigolds at Williams Lake First Nations Sugar Cane community on Wednesday, June 9. (Shawna Philbrick photo)
Little Chiefs Primary School students help plant 215 marigolds at Williams Lake First Nations Sugar Cane community on Wednesday, June 9. (Shawna Philbrick photo)
Phyllis Webstad, founder of Orange Shirt Day. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

OUR HOMETOWN: Truth and reconciliation champion

Phyllis Webstad continues to help the country understand the residential school legacy

Phyllis Webstad, founder of Orange Shirt Day. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
St. Joseph's Mission site is located about six kilometres from Williams Lake First Nation. (Photo submitted)

Williams Lake First Nation planning ground analysis of land near former residential school

St. Joseph’s Mission Indian Residential School operated from 1886 to 1981

St. Joseph's Mission site is located about six kilometres from Williams Lake First Nation. (Photo submitted)
A pod of orcas joined the 7 Generation Steward Society at the Tyee Spit singing in memorial for the 215 children found in Kamloops. Photo courtesy Cory Cliffe

VIDEO: Whales appear during Indigenous ceremony for 215 children in Campbell River

‘Our ancestors wouldn’t appear if we weren’t doing things in a good way’ — Cory Cliffe

A pod of orcas joined the 7 Generation Steward Society at the Tyee Spit singing in memorial for the 215 children found in Kamloops. Photo courtesy Cory Cliffe
Staff and students from Williams Lake First Nation’s Little Chiefs Primary School offered songs and gifts at an Every Child Matters site in Herb Gardner Park in Williams Lake on Friday, June 4. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo- Williams Lake Tribune)

First Nations school holds ceremony in Williams Lake for children buried at Kamloops Residential School

Staff and students from Little Chiefs Primary School drum, sing and add to growing memorial site

Staff and students from Williams Lake First Nation’s Little Chiefs Primary School offered songs and gifts at an Every Child Matters site in Herb Gardner Park in Williams Lake on Friday, June 4. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo- Williams Lake Tribune)
Tl’etinqox community members gather for a ceremony in memory of the 215 children buried at the former site of the Kamloops Residential School. (Facebook photo)
Tl’etinqox community members gather for a ceremony in memory of the 215 children buried at the former site of the Kamloops Residential School. (Facebook photo)
An Every Child Matters installment at Herb Gardner Park below city hall in Williams Lake is gathering children’s shoes, boots, toys and flowers. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
An Every Child Matters installment at Herb Gardner Park below city hall in Williams Lake is gathering children’s shoes, boots, toys and flowers. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Esk’etemc Chief Fred Robbins said the news about the unmarked graves at the former Kamloops Residential School site is proof of what a lot of First Nations people have been saying for many years about the children who never came home. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

OUR HOMETOWN: Advocate and survivor

Chief Fred Robbins is a residential school survivor who has advocated for truth and reconciliation

Esk’etemc Chief Fred Robbins said the news about the unmarked graves at the former Kamloops Residential School site is proof of what a lot of First Nations people have been saying for many years about the children who never came home. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
The former Kamloops Indian Residential School is seen on Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation in Kamloops, B.C. on Thursday, May 27, 2021. ( THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Snucins)

B.C. trucker organizing convoy to site of former Kamloops residential school

‘These families need closure, their voices need to be heard, we need to show support,”: Mike Otto

The former Kamloops Indian Residential School is seen on Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation in Kamloops, B.C. on Thursday, May 27, 2021. ( THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Snucins)
Williams Lake city councillor Jason Ryll is calling on the city to help advance truth and reconciliation with local area First Nations. (Williams Lake Tribune file photo)

Williams Lake city councillor calls on city to help advance truth and reconciliation

‘Mourning, prayers or thoughts, are no longer enough,’ Jason Ryll said.

Williams Lake city councillor Jason Ryll is calling on the city to help advance truth and reconciliation with local area First Nations. (Williams Lake Tribune file photo)
Save Fairy Creek supporters sport red to the May 29 Elders circle gathering to show solidarity with Indigenous People. (Nora O’Malley photo)

Solidarity builds for Indigenous claims over Fairy Creek watershed on Vancouver Island

More than 2,000 show up to join push to save old growth forests from harvesting

Save Fairy Creek supporters sport red to the May 29 Elders circle gathering to show solidarity with Indigenous People. (Nora O’Malley photo)
Splatsin Chief Wayne Christian responded to the discovery of the remains of more than 200 Indigenous children at the former site of a Kamloops residential school Friday, May 28, 2021. (Splatsin photo)

Survivor support needed in wake of ‘unimaginable’ mass burial discovery: Splatsin chief

“It really is about you — you survived that horror, and it’s important that you get what you need,” Splatsin Chief Wayne Christian said

Splatsin Chief Wayne Christian responded to the discovery of the remains of more than 200 Indigenous children at the former site of a Kamloops residential school Friday, May 28, 2021. (Splatsin photo)
Lynda Price, Chief of Ulkatcho First Nation, left, Dylan Walsh, principal of Anahim Lake Elementary Junior Secondary School, Lewis Budgell, UFN education director, Gary Holte, UFN Elders’ Executive Council, Mabelene Leon, UFN Council and Allen Louie, UFN Council stand with their new signs. (Photo submitted)

Cow moose, calf protection focus of Ulkatcho First Nation

Chief Lynda Price said the community purchased five signs to place along Highway 20

Lynda Price, Chief of Ulkatcho First Nation, left, Dylan Walsh, principal of Anahim Lake Elementary Junior Secondary School, Lewis Budgell, UFN education director, Gary Holte, UFN Elders’ Executive Council, Mabelene Leon, UFN Council and Allen Louie, UFN Council stand with their new signs. (Photo submitted)
The former Kamloops Indian Residential School is seen in this photo from the Kamloops Heritage Commission.

Remains of 215 children found at former B.C. residential school an ‘unthinkable loss’

Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation is reaching out to communities who had children attend

  • May 28, 2021
The former Kamloops Indian Residential School is seen in this photo from the Kamloops Heritage Commission.
Brandi Hansen said she was disheartened to find dozens of severed, declawed bear paws dumped in a culvert alongside a North Shuswap road on Sunday, May 23, 2021. (Contributed)

B.C. First Nations condemn those responsible for bear paws dumped near Shuswap Lake

Union of BC Indian Chiefs says poachers likely responsible

Brandi Hansen said she was disheartened to find dozens of severed, declawed bear paws dumped in a culvert alongside a North Shuswap road on Sunday, May 23, 2021. (Contributed)
Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, left, and Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb officiated naming the Nekw7usem Bridge linking the RC Cotton Trail to Scout Island on Monday, May 17. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Williams Lake pedestrian bridge officially given Secwepemc name Nekw7usem

Williams Lake mayor and Williams Lake First Nation chief unveiled new signage during naming ceremony

Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, left, and Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb officiated naming the Nekw7usem Bridge linking the RC Cotton Trail to Scout Island on Monday, May 17. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Ulkatcho First Nation’s (UFN) feral horse project conducted in February resulted in 45 feral horses being rounded up in the Anahim Lake and Nimpo Lake areas. UFN Chief Lynda Price said the photo of these horses taken in the spring after the clover arrives is a far different picture than horses that are skin and bone trying to plow through layers of ice and five feet of snow in February. (Photo submitted)

Ulkatcho First Nation’s feral horse project nets results

Concern for the health of feral horses resulted in a bylaw, feral horse project

Ulkatcho First Nation’s (UFN) feral horse project conducted in February resulted in 45 feral horses being rounded up in the Anahim Lake and Nimpo Lake areas. UFN Chief Lynda Price said the photo of these horses taken in the spring after the clover arrives is a far different picture than horses that are skin and bone trying to plow through layers of ice and five feet of snow in February. (Photo submitted)