Farming

Ranch Musings columnist David Zirnhelt. (File photo)

RANCH MUSINGS: Groundwater licensing a crisis in the making

One of the major aspects of this new law is the requirement that to use groundwater

  • May 23, 2021

 

Pumpjacks draw oil out of the ground as a deer stands in a canola field near Olds, Alta., Thursday, July 16, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canadian farmers have spring in their step from strongest commodity prices in years

Canola recently hit a 13-year peak after stubbornly low prices, gaining 52 per cent year-to-date

 

A mink sniffs the air as he surveys the river beach in search of food, in meadow near the village of Khatenchitsy, 65 kilometres northwest of Minsk, Belarus on September 4, 2015. The Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) is the latest group to speak out against mink farming in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Sergei Grits

Union of BC Indian Chiefs latest group to call for moratorium on B.C. mink farming

With other countries phasing out mink farming, time is now for province to follow suit, says union VP

 

A cow from Gloria Jackson's 100-head herd of cattle had triplets on March 7. (Submitted Photo)

Pretty, Darn, Cute — Quesnel farm celebrates rare livestock birth

Gloria Jackson welcomed triplets to her farm on March 7

A cow from Gloria Jackson's 100-head herd of cattle had triplets on March 7. (Submitted Photo)
A mink at a farm, taken on July 9, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Geoff Robins

Quarantined B.C. mink farm resumes breeding after COVID-19 outbreak

Province approves resumption of breeding at Fraser Valley farm, and 8 others not in quarantine

A mink at a farm, taken on July 9, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Geoff Robins
In early 2022, B.C. farmers and ranchers will be required to participate in the Premises Identification (ID) program. (Black Press Media files)

B.C. farmers and ranchers will be required to ID their livestock by end of 2021

The program will allow the province to trace animals in times of danger and disease

In early 2022, B.C. farmers and ranchers will be required to participate in the Premises Identification (ID) program. (Black Press Media files)
Protesting farmers and their families gather around a bonfire to mark the harvest festival, which is called Lohri, on a blocked highway in protest against new farm laws on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021. Changes in India’s farm laws could potentially open up one of the world’s most populous markets and are being closely watched by Canada’s agricultural and economic sectors, say experts. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Altaf Qadri

Changes in Indian farm laws could benefit Canada, experts say

Laws have sparked large-scale protests from farmers

Protesting farmers and their families gather around a bonfire to mark the harvest festival, which is called Lohri, on a blocked highway in protest against new farm laws on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021. Changes in India’s farm laws could potentially open up one of the world’s most populous markets and are being closely watched by Canada’s agricultural and economic sectors, say experts. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Altaf Qadri
Dave and Skye Hamming of Tazo Farms are pictured inside their barn, with roughly 110 cattle behind them. A recently installed DeLeval milking robot, pictured in the background, allows them to do more, with fewer hands. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)

Supply management key to survival of B.C. dairy industry, says Okanagan farmer

Automation, robotic milking; family farms continue to adapt to keep up with the changing times

Dave and Skye Hamming of Tazo Farms are pictured inside their barn, with roughly 110 cattle behind them. A recently installed DeLeval milking robot, pictured in the background, allows them to do more, with fewer hands. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
Ranch Musings columnist David Zirnhelt. (File Photo)

COLUMNS: Wagon road to Kluskus (Lhoosk’uz): part three

Travelling by horse and wagon is measured in days, not miles, writes columnist David Zirnhelt

  • Jan 10, 2021
Ranch Musings columnist David Zirnhelt. (File Photo)
“Comet,” born Dec. 18, survived his mother’s death at Christina Lake’s Fuster Cluck Farm after local farmers stepped in with life-saving milk. Comet is pictured in the home of Fuster Cluck’s Amy Enns-Haywood and Nigel Haywood. Photo courtesy of Amy Enns-Haywood.

Baby goat survives rocky birth at Kootenay farm after neighbours pitch in

“Comet” is thriving at Fuster Cluck Farm, where he plays with other baby goats and the farmers’ daughter

“Comet,” born Dec. 18, survived his mother’s death at Christina Lake’s Fuster Cluck Farm after local farmers stepped in with life-saving milk. Comet is pictured in the home of Fuster Cluck’s Amy Enns-Haywood and Nigel Haywood. Photo courtesy of Amy Enns-Haywood.
The Williams Lake Stockyards - Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune

RANCH MUSINGS: The co-op, and its importance to ranching in the B.C. Interior

The challenges are in the form of declining cattle numbers in B.C.

  • Dec 20, 2020
The Williams Lake Stockyards - Greg Sabatino photo - Williams Lake Tribune
In this week’s column David Zirnhelt shares some thoughts about the impact of COVID-19, from an agricultural perspective. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

COLUMN: What is happening with small farms and ranches?

What are the repercussions of this poverty on our more comfortable lives on the land?

  • Dec 13, 2020
In this week’s column David Zirnhelt shares some thoughts about the impact of COVID-19, from an agricultural perspective. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Ranch Musings columnist David Zirnhelt. (File Photo)

RANCH MUSINGS: Perennial cereals and their potential to heal

I was excited to read that Intermediate wheatgrass is now approved for human use in the U.S.

  • Nov 22, 2020
Ranch Musings columnist David Zirnhelt. (File Photo)
Spotted knapweed - Black Press Media file photo

CRD takes ranching operation to task on invasive knapweed

Knapweed is identified as a serious threat to rangelands and forests of the western U.S. and Canada

Spotted knapweed - Black Press Media file photo
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau rises during a sitting of the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic in the House of Commons, in Ottawa, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Feds reveal details of $35M fund to help make farms safer in COVID-19 pandemic

The program will be applied retroactively to cover any COVID-19-related costs from March 15

Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau rises during a sitting of the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic in the House of Commons, in Ottawa, Wednesday, June 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
A huge blueberry harvesting machine like this one (not this exact one and these are not the suspects) was taken from a rural Abbotsford property over the weekend. (Facebook photo)

UPDATE: Massive blueberry harvester stolen from rural Fraser Valley property

A huge machine with a top speed of 15 kph was taken from an area near No. 3 road over the weekend

A huge blueberry harvesting machine like this one (not this exact one and these are not the suspects) was taken from a rural Abbotsford property over the weekend. (Facebook photo)
David Zirnhelt’s weekly column discusses spending time with his grandson fishing, which focuses the mind on the good things in life. (Anna Fait photo)

RANCH MUSINGS: Special times on the ranch

This article is really about a rancher and his grandson fishing

  • Sep 12, 2020
David Zirnhelt’s weekly column discusses spending time with his grandson fishing, which focuses the mind on the good things in life. (Anna Fait photo)
B.C. Liberal agriculture critic Ian Paton addresses farmers’ rally outside the B.C. legislature over housing restrictions, Oct. 28, 2019. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

Farmers call on B.C. NDP to allow more housing, business

Secondary homes, restaurants, rentals can keep farms viable

B.C. Liberal agriculture critic Ian Paton addresses farmers’ rally outside the B.C. legislature over housing restrictions, Oct. 28, 2019. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
Corn is ripe for the picking at Soda Creek. (Soda Creek Sweet Corn photo)

Start your engines: Soda Creek corn ready to be picked

Soda Creek Sweet Corn is located north of Williams Lake

Corn is ripe for the picking at Soda Creek. (Soda Creek Sweet Corn photo)
Onions. (Pikrepo)

B.C. imports 99 million kilos of American onions. Why?

About four per cent of the onions consumed in B.C. are grown in the province

  • Aug 18, 2020
Onions. (Pikrepo)