Brityn Hinsche

Brityn Hinsche

YOUTH EXCELLENCE: Brityn Hinsche

Thirteen-year-old Brityn Hinsche always likes to be her best.

Editor’s note: For those who missed our 2016 Youth Excellence publication, we will be publishing each of the 25 features of our local youth in the coming months in our newspaper, and online, as well. This is the eighth on martial artist Brityn Hinsche, sponsored by United Floors. The publication is still available at the Tribune for those who would like a magazine.

Whether she’s blocking shots as a goalie for her rep soccer team, earning straight As in school or running 10 kilometres a day to prepare for her black belt test in karate, 13-year-old Brityn Hinsche always likes to be her best.

“It makes me feel good,” Brityn said of why she strives to achieve.

In September, nine years of training paid off for Brityn when she received her black belt in karate at the Shogun Martial Arts Academy at the youngest possible age — a feat that required five hours of testing of her technique and cardio fitness, including 300 push ups, 300 sit ups, 75 burpees and more.

“I had to run 10 kilometres without stopping and I actually did it — that was amazing,” said Brityn.

The teen said she gained confidence and a greater sense of safety from her achievement.

“It was a lot of commitment but I feel more safe because I know how to defend myself.”

Brityn said she has had many mentors along the way who have taught her to be her best and never ever give up, including her Senseis and other students at the Shogun dojo.

A self-described tomboy, it was Brityn’s mom Liz who first introduced Brityn to karate.

“I figured she was such a get-up-and-go kid we’d give karate a try,” said her mom.

As well as karate, Brityn also enjoys the physicality of soccer.

“I’m a soccer goalie so I’m not scared of getting hurt… I think I’m a little more bold than other girls that way.”

Brityn also enjoys riding horses at home with her sister, Taryn, 9, and hunting grouse with her dad, Lorne.

“I like how everything is slower than normal life,” Brityn said about hunting. “You stop and look for things.”

Throughout the school year Brityn works hard to keep her name on the distinctive honour roll at Columneetza and has already set her sights on obtaining her second degree black belt in the future, a goal that will require another two years of training.

“I love karate because you have to do it properly or it doesn’t work.”