Williams Lake Sheriff’s Department competitor Dave Olson fires at a target during an interagency fun shoot last year at the Williams Lake Sportsmen’s Association shooting range.

Williams Lake Sheriff’s Department competitor Dave Olson fires at a target during an interagency fun shoot last year at the Williams Lake Sportsmen’s Association shooting range.

Sportsmen’s association to vote to rejoin BCWL

After a two-year hiatus the Williams Lake Sportsmen’s Association will vote Monday on whether to rejoin the B.C. Wildlife Federation.

After a two-year hiatus from the organization, the Williams Lake Sportsmen’s Association will vote this Monday on whether or not to rejoin the B.C. Wildlife Federation.

WLSA president Moe Monita said the decision will have several implications for the association’s 1,000-plus member base.

“We voted to pull away [from the BCWF] two years ago,” Monita said.

“We just found they weren’t a benefit to us and we saw some internal problems there.”

Additionally, Monita said the BCWF didn’t include the club in its discussions during a First Nations moose blockade out west.

That said, Monita added since then they’ve seen new management join the BCWF and noted there are several benefits that come along with being a member.

“They have a big voice, we don’t” he said. “They can target government and stakeholders about fish, wildlife, habitat and firearms in B.C.”

One drawback, however, is the BCWF takes a fee of $30 per individual $80 WLSA membership.

“Over the past two years we found we were way ahead and we put a lot of money back into fixing the club up, the ranges, a shooting clay tower and we still want to fix up the clubhouse a bit,” he said.

Members of the BCWF receive a monthly magazine, Outdoor Edge, and rejoining will open up several doors for the WLSA to take advantage of, Monita said, including a personalized identification card, discounted merchandise and services, club promotion and programs such as a B.C. National Archery in the Schools program, Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Education, Youth for Conservation, wetlands education and wilderness watch, to name a few.

“Our club could benefit from this,” he said.

“We want our members, as many as possible, to attend and we’ll see if we’re going to rejoin them. Personally, I think either way it benefits our club, but in joining them, I think, we’ll have a greater voice.”

The vote takes place at the WLSA clubhouse at 920 Bond Lake Road at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 17 and representatives from the BCWF will be there to discuss with members the pros and cons of rejoining.