Williams Lake RCMp Const. Joel Kooger (front left) and his Cops for Cancer Tour de North teammates are set to arrive today, Sept. 23, at Canadian Tire in Williams Lake at around 5 p.m. (Photo submitted)

Williams Lake RCMp Const. Joel Kooger (front left) and his Cops for Cancer Tour de North teammates are set to arrive today, Sept. 23, at Canadian Tire in Williams Lake at around 5 p.m. (Photo submitted)

Const. Joel Kooger, Cops for Cancer team, to arrive in Williams Lake late Monday afternoon

Once riders arrive, there will be a meet and greet at Canadian Tire

Williams Lake RCMP Const. Joel Kooger and his Cops for Cancer Tour de North teammates are set to arrive at their final destination later this afternoon today in Williams Lake.

Kooger, who is participating in his fourth year of the ride, left Dawson Creek this past Tuesday on the one-week, 800-kilometre journey ending in the lakecity at Canadian Tire this evening, Sept. 23, at 5 p.m.

Once riders arrive, there will be a meet and greet at Canadian Tire, followed by a team finale dinner beginning at 7 p.m. at Mr. Mikes.

Riders on the team included: The 2019 Tour de North riders are Chris Fedoruk (Community Rider, Quesnel), Christiaan Dreyer (RCMP, Fort St. John), Curtis Davis (RCMP, New Aiyansh), Jessica Friesen (BCEHS, Prince Rupert), Joel Kooger (RCMP, Williams Lake), Keasha McAra (RCMP, Prince George), Lenin Cruz (RCMP, Chetwynd), Mark Webber (RCMP, Fort St. James), Robert Hillhouse (Community Rider, PG), Ryan Hobbs (RCMP, Houston), Sharon McLeod (Community Rider, Fort St. John) and Oleksandr (Alex) Tsitsilin (BCEHS, Prince Rupert).

READ MORE: Const. Joel Kooger hits road with Cops for Cancer

Tour de North participants raise money to help with life-saving research that has led to earlier detection of childhood cancers, better treatments and more children surviving and thriving.

They also raise funds for important support services for children affect by cancer, and their families, such as Camp Goodtimes — a medically supervised summer camp that provides a unique refugee for children and families affected by childhood cancer.

Each year, according to the Canadian Cancer Society, around 950 Canadian children under the age of 15 are diagnosed with cancer. Cancer is the top cause of disease-related death among children in Canada and two-thirds of survivors will suffer serious long-term side effects from their treatment.



sports@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter