Show appreciation for volunteers

The city streets are extra-populated with folks in cowboy hats as we welcome visitors to the 74th annual Williams Lake Bull Show and Sale and the 21st annual Williams Lake Indoor Rodeo.

The city streets are extra-populated with folks in cowboy hats as we welcome visitors to the 74th annual Williams Lake Bull Show and Sale and the 21st annual Williams Lake Indoor Rodeo.

Many of you benefit from this large influx of guests, so give some appreciation to the directors/volunteers (all unpaid) of these events who work so incredibly hard to host them annually; chairman of the bull show and sale is Bruce Rolph (Horsefly, B.C.) and Shaun Oxtoby is president of the Williams Lake Indoor Rodeo Association.

The bull show begins at 1 p.m. today and, at the show, judge Wayne Pincott of Buffalo Creek, B.C. will be challenged with selecting the champions/winners in each breed/class.

The viewing public (cattlemen) is not always in agreement with the judged choice, but the cachet of winning the grand championship title (wearing that ribbon in the sale ring) does often add extra dollars to the sale price.

The bull sale starts at 11 a.m. on Friday.

In other cattle industry news, there is an opportunity to broaden your knowledge by attending a seminar called Putting the Profit Back into Ranching.

The keynote speakers are Jim Gerrish (rancher/grasslands consultant/grazier), Kit Pharo (Colorado rancher) and Rob Davidson (grazing/fence systems coach).

The cost is $20 per/person (includes lunch — pay at the door); the date/time is May 5 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will be held at the BC Livestock yards in Williams Lake and those wanting to attend must pre-register by May 2.

For more information and/or to register, call Clint Thompson at 250-296-4592 or e-mail sanjosecattle@gmail.com.

A statement from Kit Pharo, one of the featured speakers:

“I am happy to announce that Jim Gerrish and I have been asked to join forces at two meetings in British Columbia, Canada.

“This could get exciting! Those who are afraid to think or look outside their box (comfort zone), however, probably should not attend these meetings.”

Liz Twan is a rancher and freelance columnist for the Tribune.