Negotiate, don’t legislate, teachers say

Editor: Teachers firmly believe that a negotiated, mutually agreeable settlement is possible and is in the best interest of everyone.

Editor:

Cariboo-Chilcotin teachers firmly believe that a negotiated, mutually agreeable settlement is possible and is in the best interest of everyone.

Claire Avison, an assistant deputy minister of education, has been at the bargaining table for months and has repeatedly stated that government objectives are not negotiable.

In spite of this, the minister of labour has appointed someone from within government to look into the dispute.

Another example of this government’s sense of “fair play.”

This is just like walking down the hall and knocking on a different government office door to investigate their own position.

How fair is that?

Regardless of the contempt from government, teachers continue to advocate for a quality public-education system for all of B.C.’s kids and, despite a lack of resources and support from this government, teachers are in their classrooms working diligently to provide the best possible learning for students.

Teachers are also keeping both students and parents well informed about student progress because kids matter and teachers do care.

Teachers want government to negotiate in good faith for a fair deal.

Joan Erb, president,

Cariboo-Chilcotin Teachers’ Association