Look to where the money is

The life and times of many North Americans is legend and not all of them achieved status as heroes or good guys.

The life and times of many North Americans is legend and not all of them achieved status as heroes or good guys; equally as many (or more) attained infamy as crooks, cheats, liars, scammers or robbers making assorted bad guys or gals legendary for their character and sensational crimes.

Willie Sutton was one of the latter, on the list as one of the most prolific bank robbers in the history of the U.S. He eluded capture for many years before he was finally arrested and convicted. At the sentencing, the presiding judge queried, “Willie, why do you keep robbing banks.” The response was immediate, “Because that’s where the money is, judge.”

Raoul Baxter of meating-place.com used that exchange to emphasize the thought that the U.S. (Canada) beef industry (major players in a rapidly expanding world economy) would do well to adopt a version of that mantra — look to where the money is.

China is now a major economic power and as income levels of the average citizen rise;  pressures on (quality) food production also increases and the Chinese will be unable (according to industry-analysts) to self-produce enough food/protein to feed themselves — at least in the short/medium term.

The U.S. (Canada) is presently one of the foremost suppliers of agricultural products to China, although the Chinese will certainly continue to hedge their bets (as would any big market-player) by sourcing their needs from various other countries at the same time.

So, as the Canadian beef-industry focuses on the large market in the east (Japan, South Korea, Singapore and China) which represent 1.6 billion consumers (approx.) with money we must recognize that there are many competitive beef-producing countries eying the same opportunity and take nothing for granted by remaining aggressive in the market place, where nothing ever remains the same and operate (deal) with integrity to keep favour.