Caribou herds in B.C. are divided into four groups, southern mountain (shown), central mountain, northern mountain and boreal. (B.C. government)

LETTERS: Wolf kills, wilderness protection and caribou recovery

Readers respond to Tom Fletcher’s column on B.C. program

Re: Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou (B.C. Views, Oct. 13)

Killing wolves has been the “white man’s way” since we invaded First Nations’ territories prior to and after 1867.

Wolves are predators, caribou are prey, but recent documentaries by researchers have shown wolves to have a beneficial impact on more than prey numbers. Their activity affects the environment in ways that short-sighted hunters and biologists could not perceive.

Those who study wolves probably have conflicting information than those who study caribou.

Patrick Longworth, Penticton

• • •

The mountain caribou saga drags on with each new attempt by a fresh batch of bio-miracle-workers determined to reverse the inevitable.

The animals are able to exist in areas where snow is deep and dense enough to support them as they go from one feeding site to the next in search of arboreal lichens that are their primary source of food in winter.

Deer, elk, moose, wolves and cougars do not occupy this environment in winter, while grizzly bears do, they are not a threat when hibernating.

This particular caribou subspecies are nivaphiles (snow-lovers) and able to exist where the others, being nivaphobes (snow-haters) cannot. Wolves do not follow snowmobile tracks because they don’t exist in the deep snow environment in winter!

Therefore, Conservation Officers are not protecting mountain caribou, but they are preventing riders from enjoying the “steep and the deep” under the pretext of protecting the environment.

Ken Sumanik MSc (Zoology), retired B.C. government big game and habitat biologist, Richmond

• • •

I almost spit my coffee out when I read the quote “Caribou are declining in Wells Gray Provincial Park….where there has been no modern-day industrial disturbance.” The Wells Gray caribou herd’s range extends far beyond Wells Gray park.

I just got back from an expedition to core critical habitat of the Wells Gray herd, where I found more than 500 CFL football fields being logged just outside the park. This logging began in April, within core critical habitat.

I don’t think it’s rocket science to understand that for a species to survive, they need habitat. Of course, putting them in a pen and killing their predators will probably achieve an increase in caribou numbers, but this is less like recovery and more like a zoo.

Recovery means self-sustaining populations, where human influence is not needed. The over-reliance on wolf culls and maternity pens without protecting sufficient habitat will never achieve self-sustaining populations in the long run.

I’ve also been to the habitat of the South Selkirk herd. The amount of linear disturbance and resource extraction is immense. Yes, there were backcountry signs saying something like “caribou habitat stay out.” These signs were covered in bullet holes and signs on top of the ministry signs that said “snowmobiling closure not the answer.” Followed by snowmobile tracks into habitat which was supposed to be off limits.

Charlotte Dawe, conservation campaigner, Wilderness Committee, Vancouver

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

‘Slow down’: Williams Lake RCMP caution motorists after overnight rain makes roads icy

Black ice being reported on Highway 20, Likely and Horsefly Roads

Hoyer: ‘Just cheer away … I can hear you here’

The three-time, back-to-back-to-back medalist, will be looking to climb back atop the mountain

Bantam T-wolves look to build on success at home tourney this weekend

Teams at the tournament will be Kamloops, Quesnel and Fort St. John

LCSS students putting on art show for the community

On Jan. 24 the students will be hosting an opening night from 5 to 8 p.m. for the public to attend

Fashion Fridays: The basics you need for your body type

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

New U.S. LNG terminal near northwestern B.C. town proposed

AlaskCAN International LNG wants terminal just over Canadian border, but using B.C gas

‘I would not go’ to China says B.C. traveller concerned about coronavirus

Alice Li said she goes to China every other year but would scrap any travel plans

Royal Canadian Legion expels B.C. member for wearing unearned military commendations

‘Stolen valour is stolen service and it’s just totally wrong’

‘Latte-sipping urbanites’ need to realize value of mining in B.C., association head says

Industry generates a total of $3.9 billion in sales of goods and service across the province

Uber, Lyft approved for ride-hailing in Lower Mainland

Kater Technologies Inc.’s application was rejected

B.C. man rescued after getting trapped headfirst in well as water level rose

The rescue involved crews from Oak Bay and Saanich

Investigators in wildfire-torn Australia head to site of B.C. airtanker crash

The B.C. government sends condolences to Port Alberni-owned Coulson Aviation

RCMP investigating sexual allegation against Lower Mainland police officer

Delta officer suspended while the alleged off-duty incident involving a co-worker is investigated

Most Read