Letter: Build bridges rather than point out fault

We here in Williams Lake may not be close to what is happening around the world regarding terrorism, but some things may concern us.

Editor:

We here in Williams Lake may not be close to what is happening around the world regarding terrorism, but there are some things that may concern us, as governments crack down on suspected terrorists.

Increasingly laws will be passed that will also eventually impact us. Of course, following 9/11 travel                       ling across boarders and even within our country, all kinds of things occurred that many found uncomfortable and disconcerting including full body searches.

The question remains as to how governments react to current events, in France for an example, following the Charlie Hebdo massacre. France is moving very quickly to curtail free speech, even though the massacre was about the right to have free speech. Within the past week a 28-year-old French-Tunisian man was found guilty of shouting support for the Charlie Hebdo attackers and was sentenced to six months in prison. I agree 100 per cent with Pope Francis, regarding the printing of the newest issue of Charlie Hebdo, depicting Mohammad crying. We need to quit finding fault with other religions. Even here in North America many call themselves Christians while communicating to our congregations how terrible other religions are.

If we are as Christian as we claim to be, how come we are not building bridges rather than constantly finding fault and tearing down.

Canadians need to be world leaders in learning, and applying what we claim to teach, “Love thy neighbour” while at the same time discontinue, pillorying each others’ faith.

We are seeing the worst in Muslim religion as it is being led by extremist groups. We need to be seeking out and building bridges between those of the Muslim faith that do not support that kind of extremism. We will never achieve a peaceful world if we continue to tar all with the same brush.

We may lose some freedoms as governments attempt to do all they can to protect us, changes of little concern to most law abiding Canadian citizens.

Those that do come to Canada as our welcome guests need to work harder at assimilation, and we need to put more effort in helping them achieve that, Canada is unique — let’s keep it that way.

Doug Wilson

Williams Lake