FOREST INK: UN 2030 agenda for sustainable development sets ambitious goals

This was the second visit by facilitators Mike and Luke who were looking for some suggestions

Last week I was among a group of locals who attended an information session sponsored by the BC Council for International Cooperation (BCCIC).

This was the second visit by facilitators Mike and Luke who were looking for some suggestions as to how the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs ) could be implemented in our community.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development lead by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 SDGs, which are an urgent call for action by all countries — developed and developing ­— in a global partnership.

They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth — all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests.

READ MORE: Community forests have many advantages for rural communities

The SDGs build on decades of work by countries and the UN, including the first international meeting in 1992, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil where more than 178 countries adopted the first agenda.

This was followed by the Millennium Declaration at the 2000 UN Headquarters in New York and subsequent conferences held in Johannesburg in 2002 and again in Rio in 2012.

I would be the first to admit that the goals are rather daunting but after witnessing actions by individuals and organizations following calamities like the 2017 wildfires I am encouraged by what we are all capable of.

We probably know people who work for organizations like the Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders or Salvation Army to name a few.

How about the work done by the people and organizations who rebuilt homes lost in the last two years to flooding or wild fires?

I know some locals who have gone on their own to developing countries to help with women’s health issues along with using local materials to establish clean water and sanitation facilities.

What price can you put on the life changing work done by Operation Smile for children with cleft palates or health professionals who volunteer to work with temporary medical facilities set up throughout the world.

Others have chosen to stay home and develop solar cookers or efficient wood burning stoves to improve the health of families and reduce deforestation issues.

READ MORE: New approach needed to managing forests

When I was asked recently to participate in a local race, I challenged the 400 plus young runners to set goals and reminded them about how young teens like Craig Kielburger along with his friends and family made a difference to thousands of children who were caught up in the sweat shops around the world.

While I agree that climate change is important it is only one of 17 issues described in the 2030 UN report and I think our young people need encouragement in their career choices to see the potential for some very interesting and challenging work that is both fulfilling, and critical for all of us living on this planet.

Jim Hilton is a professional agrologist and forester who has lived and worked in the Cariboo Chilcotin for the past 40 years. Now retired, Hilton still volunteers his skills with local community forests organizations.


Do you have a comment about this story? email:
editor@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

LETTER: Let’s hear some of the benefits of rail tie burning

“I gave the management of the henhouse to the fox, all will be well.”

Williams Lake first-ever Pride in the Puddle parade approved by city council

The parade will be part a pride festival in the lakecity

Update: Council awards contract for RC Cotton pedestrian bridge

Council approved the $623,595 tender at the regular meeting Tuesday, June 26

Tsilhqot’in Nation urges Taseko Mines to stop drilling plans before conflict grows

Nation said Teztan Biny area is of ‘profound cultural and spiritual importance’

VIDEO: Killer whale steals fisherman’s catch off North Coast

Fishing duel results in eager orca snagging salmon in Prince Rupert

Fate of accused in Canadian couple’s 1987 killings in jury’s hands

William Talbott’s lawyer says DNA doesn’t prove murder

Child killed after being hit in driveway on Vancouver Island

The driver of the vehicle remained at the crash scene and is fully cooperating

Eating sandwiches, putting on makeup behind the wheel could land you a fine

RCMP say if you cause an accident while eating you could be penalized

Cat badly hurt in animal trap was likely stuck for days, B.C. owner says

Blu, a three-year-old house cat, suffered severe damage to his hind leg after being stuck in trap for days

40 cats surrendered in apparent hoarding at B.C. home

Officers found the cats living among piles of garbage and feces, suffering from fleas

Vancouver Aquarium drops cetacean ban lawsuit in new lease agreement

Ocean Wise CEO Lasse Gustavsson called the updated lease an exciting new chapter for the aquarium

Thieves steal two $40K chairs featuring gold serpents from B.C. furniture store

Chairs believed to be the only two of its kind in Canada, police said

Rising gas prices force B.C. residents to rethink summer road trips: poll

63 per cent of respondents reported gas prices are impacting their day-to-day finances

Most Read