Bear removal not always best option

The no-kill approach to nuisance bears sounds nice at first glance but on closer inspection problems become evident.

Editor:

The no-kill approach to nuisance bears sounds nice at first glance but on closer inspection problems become evident.

First, and most important, it isn’t safe. Gary Shelton, ex-CO from Bella Coola in his book “Bear Attack,” says that when it comes to wanting you for lunch the black bear is more dangerous than the grizzly. Any bear that is not afraid of humans is an animal to fear. Moving a dangerous bear from one location to another doesn’t make him become a “safe” bear. He is just a dangerous bear in a different place.

Relocating isn’t a good solution. In the first place, you are probably putting this animal in another animals’ territory and are subjecting it to a very stressful if not lethal situation.  Very possibly your relocated animal will decide that life was better in its old home and decide to return there. A bear from North Vancouver was relocated to Wells Gray Provincial Park but he returned immediately to Vancouver.

Ms. Mikuse suggests bear spray as a deterrent. Bear spray is only useful as a defense mechanism. It is only 75 per cent effective and this at a distance of 10 feet or less. There are documented accounts of bears actually liking the spicy flavor of bear spray. Spraying your environs will only serve to attract bears.

Picking your apples defeats the purpose of having an apple tree. If they aren’t picked while they are green the bear will probably get them and will ruin your tree in the process.

If you want to compost your organic waste you will have to have your composter in the house.

I believe that any bear that is not afraid of you is a threat to your property, to you, and especially to children. It should therefore be eliminated.

Margie Kaufman

Soda Creek