Williams Lake Indian Band will begin leasing lots at its Coyote Rock Development after receiving endorsement from community members through a referendum. Photo submitted

Williams Lake Indian Band will begin leasing lots at its Coyote Rock Development after receiving endorsement from community members through a referendum. Photo submitted

WLIB to begin leasing lots at Coyote Rock development

After five years in the making, the Williams Lake Indian Band is ready to lease residential and commercial lots near its Sugar Cane community on Highway 97

Williams Lake Indian Band has received endorsement from its membership to proceed with leasing lands surrounding its Coyote Rock Golf Course.

Nearly 70 per cent of voters participating in a referendum held Wednesday, March 21 voted in favour.

Chief Ann Louie said the band held a similar vote in 2004, but the community was still under the Indian Act at that point.

“In 2014, WLIB entered the First Nations Land Management regime and became self-governing over lands management,” Louie said, noting the band had to hold another vote under its own law to authorize the leases.

Pleased with the vote outcome giving the band endorsement to move ahead with its economic development plants, Louie said the Coyote Rock development has been a “cornerstone” of the band’s economic strategy for years.

“We’ve put in the infrastructure and we’ve have the leasing framework in place,” she said. “Now all that remains is to continue marketing the lands and begin construction improvements.”

Read More: WLIB opens government offices in downtown Williams Lake

It is anticipated construction of the first residential home and commercial developments at site will begin this year, she added.

Coyote Rock subdivision covers roughly 30 acres slated for multi-use development. There are 90 residential lots and 10 commercial lots.

The first phase of the residential development will see the sale of 28 lake-view lots and purchasers will obtain a renewable 125-year lease of the lots.

Coun. Willie Sellars said the band has invested more than $8 million in building the development.

“Both the residential and commercial properties have amazing views and sun exposure, and the quality of our access and services is better than any other in the region.”

Each lot, he added, has treated water, sewer collection, sidewalks and street lights. They are close to a golf course, and walking and biking trails.

“People really need to come and have a look,” Sellars said.

In development for more than five years, the project integrates with the four-laning and other improvements to Highway 97 through the WLIB Indian Reserve #1.

Read More: Coyote Rock land development underway



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