A peaceful protest is underway outside the Williams Lake RCMP detachment to show solidarity with members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation who oppose a proposed LNG pipeline in their territory. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

A peaceful protest is underway outside the Williams Lake RCMP detachment to show solidarity with members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation who oppose a proposed LNG pipeline in their territory. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Wet’suwet’en supporters rally in front of Williams Lake RCMP detachment

Organizers say protest to raise awareness of the issue, encourage others to become informed

Update 12:26 p.m.

There were three protesters outside the Williams Lake RCMP detachment Wednesday participating in a protest in support of the Wet’suwet’en who oppose a proposed pipeline in their territory.

The three men told the Tribune a bigger protest is planned for the same location on Thursday, Feb. 13, at noon.

10:30 a.m.

About a dozen people are participating in a Wet’suwet’in Solidarity Action protest outside the Williams Lake RCMP detachment Wednesday morning.

The purpose of the protest is to draw attention in Williams Lake to what is happening in Wet’suwet’en territory and encourage others to become informed and do credible research for themselves, said Erin Hitchcock, one of the organizers.

“I cannot imagine someone coming to my home and telling me that I have to get out or I face arrest so that they can demolish my home,” Hitchcock said. “They have never ceded their territory out there.”

Read more: Wet’suwet’in Solidarity Action protest planned for outside Williams Lake RCMP detachment Wednesday

Annette Frank, a justice worker from Tle’tinqox First Nation, walked across the street from the court house to join the protest.

“I am in support with the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs going against the pipeline,” Frank said.

Another protestor said he supported the protests happening across the country and felt the one in Williams Lake Wednesday will be the first of more to come.

Keith Monroe of the Council of Canadians criticized Premier John Horgan for interpreting recent arrests in Wet’suwet’in territory as the ‘rule of law.’

“I find his comment kind of offensive because it’s a pretty narrow definition of the rule of law,” Monroe said. “It’s only colonial law. What about international law? What about Indigenous law?”

Monroe said the other way of looking at it is the use of force to maintain control of stolen property.

“That’s the flip side,” Monroe said. “It’s complicated by divisions in the First Nations community obviously. The hereditary chiefs have one position on it and some of the band councils have another.”

Roger Hamilton, also with the Council of Canadians, said he’s opposed to the LNG project and starting it at this time is a ‘reckless’ plan.

“The Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs are opposed to it so I am supporting them,” Hamilton said.

Read more: Pipeline protesters shut down major Vancouver intersection in support of Wet’suwet’en



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Wet’suwet’en supporters rally in front of Williams Lake RCMP detachment