Watch out for legally set snares as trapping season unfolds

Watch out for legally set snares as trapping season unfolds

COS reminds recreational users Williams Lake is surrounded by several traplines

The Conservation Officer Service is investigating after receiving a complaint from a resident whose dog’s neck became caught by a snare in the Dairy Fields area of Williams Lake.

Sgt. Jeff Tyre with the COS, however, reminded the public the lawful use of killing snares and other trapping methods are allowed for several fur-bearing animals within Region 5 throughout the winter, with the core of the trapping season running from Oct. 15 to March. 31.

Hunting Trapping Synopsis 2018 2020 by WL Tribune on Scribd

“Recreational users should be aware that there is lawful trapping occurring throughout the winter,” Tyre said. “Williams Lake is surrounded by several traplines. In fact, most of the Cariboo Chilcotin is divided into registered traplines.”

There is no requirement to post areas that are being used for this purpose although some trappers choose to do so on their own accord, he added.

“Most ethical trappers do their utmost to avoid negative interactions with the public and with pets but regrettably this does sometimes occur.”

If a pet is caught in a snare or trap, residents are encouraged to immediately contact the COS by calling 1-877-952-7277 (RAPP) as COs have the resources to free a captured pet and will follow up with the trapline holder and discuss options to avoid such incidents.

Tyre also said it is illegal to tamper with or remove a lawfully set trap or snare.

“The matter may result in enforcement action being taken by the COS,” Tyre said. “All reports of suspected illegal trapping activity should be reported to RAPP.”

Read more: 100 Mile House and surrounding areas should be aware of traplines on Crown Land



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A local resident’s dog was caught in a snare in the Dairy Fields recently, prompting her to report it to the Conservation Officer Service only to learn that trapping season is underway and many snares are legally set. Photo submitted

A local resident’s dog was caught in a snare in the Dairy Fields recently, prompting her to report it to the Conservation Officer Service only to learn that trapping season is underway and many snares are legally set. Photo submitted