Cariboo Prince George MP Todd Doherty said the Wet’suwet’en who support the Coastal GasLink pipeline need to be heard, but are afraid to speak out because they feel intimidated and bullied. (File image)

VIDEO: Protests having ‘rippling’ effect: MP Todd Doherty

Allowing professional activists to disrupt us is doing a disservice to reconciliation, Doherty said

Protests in support of the Wet’suwet’en who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline are having a rippling effect, said Cariboo-Prince George MP Todd Doherty.

“The majority of the protests have nothing to do with the Wet’suwet’en people but are there to cause disruption,” he told the Tribune Thursday.

Read more: All VIA Rail trains, eastern CN rail network shut down due to pipeline blockades

Reconciliation, he added, is about moving forward together.

“I think allowing this group of professional activists to really disrupt us is doing a disservice to reconciliation.”

Since the arrest of people by RCMP enforcing an injunction at Wet’suwet’en anti-pipeline camps, protests have erupted across B.C. and other areas of Canada showing solidarity for the pipeline opposition.

An Angus Reid Institute poll released Thursday found that 51 per cent of Canadians support the natural gas pipeline being built while 39 per cent support the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs that are opposed and 63 per cent believe there needs to be more consultation.

Doherty said Canada needs to listen and support the real voices of the Wet’suwet’en — the ones who voted in favour of this project.

“They are afraid to come forward and publicly voice their support for the project because they are being bullied and harassed.”

Doherty shared his concerns in a Facebook video Tuesday evening featuring three Wet’suwet’en people, including a hereditary chief, speaking out in favour of the pipeline project.

“Consultation took place,” Doherty said. “There was five or six years of consultation. They walked the land, 85 per cent of Wet’suwet’en signed on, 20 First Nations signed on to lift their communities up.”

Doherty said what started out with a ‘small group’ of activists has now stretched across the country.

“I’m hearing from shippers who have lost tens of millions at this point. They are in a crisis mode and unable to meet contract demands with customers.”

The situation is impacting all Canadians — whether they are Indigenous or not, he added. It is having an impact on Canada’s global reputation as a safe country to do business with, Doherty said.

Read more: B.C. officials meet Wet’suwet’en chiefs over gas pipeline protest



news@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

‘Big appreciation sound-off’ planned to honour Williams Lake health care providers

The parade will begin at 7 p.m. going through the Cariboo Memorial Hospital parking lot

COVID-19: Screening tent going up outside of Cariboo Memorial Hospital

Tent for patients with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms referred by health care provider

Interior Health officials outline pandemic response in virtual town hall

Kelowna-Lake County MLA Norm Letnick moderates digital discussion, Q&A with Interior Health leadership

Williams Lake business discovers front door lock removed

Even if business are closed due to COVID-19, they need to check buildings: Nick Sardy

Back to school: District 27 workforce to provide critical support during COVID-19 pandemic

Superintendent Chris van der Mark said he hopes the district can be a source of calm for communities

B.C. VIEWS: Small businesses need our help

Just as integral in neighbourhoods in Vancouver and Surrey as they are in Prince George or Kelowna

‘Tremendous’ response from blood donors has supply keeping pace with demand

About 400,000 of Canada’s 37 million residents give blood on a regular basis

Morning world update: Cases surge past 600,000; positive news in Germany

Spain suffers its deadliest day as Germany considers April 20 to possibly loosen restrictions

VIDEO: Penguins roam empty halls of Vancouver Aquarium

COVID-19 has forced the Vancouver Aquarium to close access to guests – leaving room for its residents

Kids get back to learning in B.C., online

Ministry of Education rolls out new tool for school

67 more B.C. COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Vancouver region

Positive tests found in Surrey, Langley long-term care facilities

Food Banks BC already seeing surge in demand due to COVID-19 pandemic

Executive director Laura Lansink said they expect applications will keep increasing

Most Read