Some open burning allowed again in Cariboo Fire Centre

As of Friday, Sept. 14, Category 2 open fires will once again be allowed throughout the Cariboo Fire Centre’s jurisdiction, due to a decreased wildfire risk in the region.

However, larger Category 3 open fires will remain prohibited throughout the Cariboo Fire Centre until Sept. 29, or until the public is otherwise notified. A poster explaining the different categories of open burning is available online: http://ow.ly/znny309kJv5

The following activities will also be allowed throughout the Cariboo Fire Centre’s jurisdiction as of noon on Sept. 14:

• The burning of stubble or grass in an area under 0.2 hectares

• The burning of one or two piles concurrently (no larger than two metres high by three metres wide)

• The use of sky lanterns

• The use of tiki torches and chimineas

• The use of fireworks, including firecrackers

• The use of burn barrels or burning cages of any size or description

• The use of binary exploding targets (e.g. for target practice)

• The use of air curtain burners (forced-air burning systems)

A map of the affected areas is available online: http://ow.ly/oqCR30jqeKz

Anyone wishing to conduct a Category 2 burn should first check with local authorities for any other restrictions before lighting any fire.

Anyone who lights, fuels or uses a Category 2 open fire must comply with the Environmental Management Act and the open burning smoke control regulation.

The act requires individuals to check local venting conditions prior to lighting a fire and ensure that conditions are favourable for burning.

Local venting conditions can be obtained by calling 1-888-281-2992 or visiting: www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/epdpa/venting/venting.html

Anyone lighting a campfire must maintain a fireguard by removing flammable debris from around the campfire area. They must never leave the campfire unattended, and must have a hand tool or at least eight litres of water available nearby to properly extinguish it. Make sure that the ashes are cold to the touch before leaving the area for any length of time.

Anyone found in contravention of an open burning prohibition may be issued a ticket for $1,150, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000 or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.

To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call *5555 on a cellphone or 1-800-663-5555 toll-free. For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, visit: www.bcwildfire.ca.



sports@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Reach a Reader day just around the corner

Join the Cariboo-Chilcotin Partners for Literacy in celebrating the importance of literature

Royal Canadian Legion gearing up for Robbie Burns Night

Community invited to celebrate the famous Scottish bard Jan. 26

COLUMNS: The evolution of wood fibre flow in B.C.

The movement of wood products throughout B.C. and beyond has been changing… Continue reading

Young Agrarians Hosting mixer for Cariboo farmers

Come learn more about agriculture and business this February

Cannabis retail applications spark debate in Williams Lake

Are we stifling economic growth or promoting public safety?

VIDEO: Students in MAGA hats mock Native American at Indigenous Peoples March

Diocese in Kentucky says it is investigating the matter, caught on video by onlookers

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Women’s March returns across the U.S. amid shutdown and controversy

The original march in 2017, the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, drew hundreds of thousands of people

Federal Liberals announce former B.C. MLA as new candidate in byelection

Richard Lee will face off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

No winning ticket in $10 million Lotto Max jackpot

No win in Friday night’s draw means the next Lotto Max draw will be approximately $17 million

Most Read