Maranda Wycotte and Cathie Durfeld

Share shed good for public and staff

The Cariboo Regional District’s share shed in Williams Lake is a busy spot.

The Cariboo Regional District’s share shed in Williams Lake is a busy spot.

Williams Lake Association for Community Living has had the contract to run the shed since last spring and job coach Cathie Durfeld has seen up to 35 vehicles in the parking lot at once.

“Since we’ve come in the volume has increased. People see it’s clean and organized,” Durfeld said at the site on Frizzi Road Friday.

Maranda Wycotte was working with Durfeld and as vehicles pulled up to drop off donations while other people waiting expectedly mulled through the donations, Wycotte said one of her jobs is to make sure things are kept clean.

“It’s neat in the sense that we meet different types of people,” she added.

Through a contract with the CRD, community living provides a job coach and an employee.

Figuring out when to provide employees has been a learning experience working with the CRD to find the right balance, Durfeld said.

In the winter, the shifts are four hours. In the summer they are seven hours.

“It’s so busy in May, June and July.  We don’t have five minutes to sit down.”

Mitch Minchau, manager of environmental services for the CRD, said it’s better to have someone running the place.

“Without having anyone there it gets to be fairly disorganized,” Minchau said. “There tends to be more aggression between users, that sort of thing. It’s better to have someone directing folks to obey the rules.”

Since the share shed opened four years ago it  has been run through a contract, however, community living has been able to provide more manned hours than previous contractees.

All of the recycling refuse sites have share sheds, with the one in Williams Lake being the largest, Minchau said.

Up to 12 people are employed at the share shed, with each person working one shift every other week, Durfeld explained.

They earn minimum wage and Wycotte, 29, said she uses her earnings to go bowling or enjoy other leisure activities.

She also works at shredding papers for local businesses.

A few years ago the association purchased and set up a commercial shredder so it could do confidential shredding.

“We also have a bin at the recycling lot for beverage bottles,” Durfeld said. “When people show up to do their recycling we ask them to put the bottles aside in the bin and then some of our workers will sort them.”

Durfeld has been a job coach for 35 years and said the people she’s worked with at community living are determined and hardworking.

“They never complain. We were out delivering hundreds of newspapers during last Wednesday’s big snowfall plus doing snow removal for businesses and private places and I didn’t hear a single person whine,” she said.

Once they settle into a job, they want to work, she added.

Minchau said share sheds fall within the CRD’s management strategy to encourage the public to reuse, reduce and recycle.

“It’s at the top of the pyramid if you like. It’s one of the first things we encourage people to do. If something has a useful life, why throw it in the landfill if someone else can make use of it.”

During the public review of the CRD’s facilities two years ago, staff heard that share sheds are very much appreciated by the public.

“They really wanted to see them continued,” Minchau said.

 

Just Posted

Cow Moose Sign founder wants LEH for antlerless moose hunt in B.C. stopped

“Shooting a cow moose — it’s just not the right thing to do, especially in this region”

‘A balanced view’: How to talk to kids about B.C.’s overdose crisis

Two teens died of suspected overdoses last week in B.C., prompting parents to talk to children about drug use

Are your kids spending too much time on social media?

Study suggests it can hurt teens’ mental health

Back to school supplies community fundraiser in the works to help local children

Staples is collecting donations to help families in need

Three generations of Seiberts to race together Saturday at Thunder Mountain

Karl Seibert, his son, Trevor Seibert, and his grandson, Ryley Seibert, are all set to race

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

B.C. Hydro applies for rare cut in electricity rates next year

Province wrote off $1.1 billion debt to help reverse rate increase

Speculation tax forces sale of Greater Victoria’s iconic ‘Tulip House’

Bob and Jan Fleming selling their retirement home famous for its thousands of tulips

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Man at centre of dropped HIV-disclosure case sues province and 10 cops

Brian Carlisle of Abbotsford says Mission RCMP defamed him and were ‘negligent’ in their investigation

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

Most Read