RCMP First Nations Policing's Const. Sam Nakatsu (left) and Const. Colby Hendrickson stationed outside the Elks Hall Tuesday while a Northern Shuswap Tribal Council meeting was taking place inside said the day was running smoothly.

RCMP First Nations Policing's Const. Sam Nakatsu (left) and Const. Colby Hendrickson stationed outside the Elks Hall Tuesday while a Northern Shuswap Tribal Council meeting was taking place inside said the day was running smoothly.

RCMP keep watch over NStQ citizens assembly

RCMP officers said the annual Northern Shuswap Tribal Council (NStQ) citizens assembly taking place inside was going smoothly.

RCMP officers stationed outside the Elks Hall Tuesday said the annual Northern Shuswap Tribal Council (NStQ) citizens assembly taking place inside was going smoothly.

Police presence was requested because on February 11 protestors halted voting on the treaty process at Williams Lake Indian Band, smashing a ballot box and ripping up ballots.

‘When the revote takes place Thursday, April 28 at Sugar Cane, there will be plenty of security in place,” said NStQ communications manager Brad McGuire.

During the two-day citizens assembly it is anticipated more than 300 people will attend.

“They are being given an update on the treaty process and where we’re at with it,” McGuire said, noting a panel made up of the treaty negotiating team and chiefs and councils would be answering questions from those in attendance.

McGuire said there was one Canim Lake Band member present who lives at Sugar Cane that is part of a Secwepemc grassroots group opposed to the modern treaty process.

“Anyone who is a registered member of one of the bands is welcome to attend the meetings,” McGuire said. “Leadership wants everyone to know that each person has a voice, but asks that they be respectful.”

Williams Lake Staff Sgt. Del Byron said Wednesday it remained calm all day at the hall Tuesday.