Ranchers concerned about rising costs of earthen dams

Regional district takes concern to UBCM, moving forward to Province

The Cariboo Regional District got a resolution passed at the recent Union of BC Municipalities convention that, if enacted by the provincial government, would greatly benefit some Cariboo-Chilcotin ranchers.

CRD chair Al Richmond says ranchers have been told they have to maintain, repair and inspect of their agricultural dams.

In the past, ranchers were given permits to construct earthen dams and then the Ministry Agriculture, Food and Fisheries would have dam inspectors look at them, he explains.

“Now, [government] is trying to shift that whole responsibility to the agricultural sector to maintain these dams.

“Some of these dams are not being maintained, but it’s not easily feasible for the [ranchers] to hire inspectors and they want to certify these dams.”

Therefore, a resolution that “UBCM call on the Province to work with agricultural dam owners to assist them in meeting the requirements of the Dam Safety Regulation in order that these water storage resources are safely preserved for food production and other values in the future” was introduced.

That resolution was followed with another resolution: “UBCM request the Province to fairly apportion the cost of inspecting and maintaining agricultural dams in a manner that takes into account other shared values and the level of development downstream from the dams.”

Richmond says it’s a big burden to put on a rancher who has maintained these structures for 15 to 20 years and, now, has to hire a professional engineer to inspect them, rather than have a dam inspector make an independent decision.

Then, if repairs were needed, they have a hard time finding people who will do the work because they would have to sign off on it.

Richmond says the resolution was passed and will now be moved forward to the provincial government.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Indigenous student eyes veterinary school

Alicia William would be the first veterinary for the Tsilhqot’in Nation

First Nation community signs enforcement agreement with Conservation Officer Service

This is the fourth such agreement in the Cariboo Chilcotin

100 per cent of Cariboo businesses have had to reduce employee hours or lay employees off, study finds

This survey was conducted by the BC Chamber of Commerce called the COVID-19 Impact Pulse Check #3

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Thanks for helping the Williams Lake Tribune continue its mission to provide trusted local news

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Trudeau acknowledges racial unrest in U.S.; ‘We also have work to do in Canada’

‘Anti-black racism, racism, is real; it’s in the United States, but it’s also in Canada,’ Trudeau says

State of Local Emergency declared for Boundary as communities brace for river flooding

Warm weather and heavy rain could cause sections of Kettle River system to swell beyond 2018 levels

Large cruise ships barred from Canadian waters until end of October: Garneau

Last year 140 cruise ships brought more than two million visitors to Canadian ports

Minneapolis cop who knelt on man’s neck charged with murder

Arrest comes after three days of protests, which escalated in violence as demonstrators torched a police precinct

Police watchdog recommends charges against five Mounties in Prince George man’s death

Police used pepper spray on the man, who then had trouble breathing before dying at the scene

B.C. tourism seeks relief as businesses wait for COVID-19 restrictions to ease

Mid-June earliest for more in-province travel to be authorized

Most Read