The Meadows in the Sky at Mt Revelstoke National Park. (Photo submitted)

Parks Canada asking for feedback on management of Rocky Mountain region parks

The public will also have a chance to engage with the draft management plan in 2020

  • Jan. 30, 2019 10:45 a.m.

Parks Canada is looking for feedback from Canadians on the future of the seven national parks in the Rocky Mountain Region including Glacier, Mt. Revelstoke, Yoho, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay and Waterton.

Updated management plans for each of the parks are due in 2020. Input from the Canadian public, from stakeholder organizations, from Indigenous peoples and from local communities and visitors will play an important role in helping to shape and guide the priorities for each of the mountain national parks through the development of individual management plans, said a news release from the federal minister of Environment and Climate Change.

“We are committed to listening to Canadians, and working with them to protect our natural heritage across the country. Canada’s mountain national parks are national treasures. Internationally renowned for their breathtaking landscapes, amazing visitor experiences, and incredible biodiversity, these places are ours to preserve and discover,” Minister Catherine McKenna said in the news release. “I encourage all Canadians to get involved and help shape the future of these special places.”

All Canadians, including youth and newcomers, are encouraged to get involved and help shape the future of the mountain national parks. Additional information is available at: letstalkmountainparks.ca.

Canada’s mountain national parks are some of the oldest national parks in Canada. Banff was Canada’s first national park established in 1885. Yoho and Glacier national parks followed closely in 1886 and Waterton Lakes National Park was added in 1895. Jasper National Park was established in 1907 and Mt. Revelstoke National Park joined in 1914. Kootenay is the youngest of the mountain national parks having been established in 1920.

The first stage of public engagement is now underway for Banff, Jasper, Yoho, Kootenay, Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks and will run to April 30, 2019.

The public engagement for Waterton Lakes National Park will begin later this winter.

Parks Canada is inviting people to share their vision of what each of these national parks might look like at its future best, and the future challenges and opportunities that will be important to address in the next plans.

Based on the input received, Parks Canada will develop individual draft management plans for further review input during a second stage of public engagement expected in early 2020.

Feedback collected during the second stage will help to finalize each management plan in 2020.

Management plans are a legislative requirement of the Canada National Parks Act and guide the management of Parks Canada places.

Through management plans, Parks Canada meets its promise to maintain or restore ecological integrity and provide Canadians with opportunities for discover and enjoy the national parks.

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