New agreements reached on Tsilhqot’in title lands

The TNG and Province of B.C. announced Friday they have reached five new agreements that will provide clarity and certainty

The Tsilhqot’in National Government (TNG) and Province of B.C. have signed five new agreements they said will provide clarity and certainty on activities in the Tsilhqot’in Declared Title area.

Tuesday, June 26 will mark the fourth-year anniversary of the Supreme Court of Canada decision that granted declaration of Aboriginal title to the Tsilhqot’in for approximately 1,900 square kilometres of land, giving them the right to decide how the land will be used, the right to economic benefits of the land and the right to proactively use and manage the land.

Areas covered in the new agreements, as outlined in a joint press release issued Friday, June 22 include:

Access and authorization for commercial and residential recreation licences, leases and permits, previously issued to third parties by the provincial government.

Access for licensed angling guides and authorization for angling activities;

Access for registered trappers and authorization for trapping activities;

Management and continued public use, and commercial use under permit, for the provincial protected areas, Ts’ilʔos Park, Nunsti Park and the Cardiff mountain Ecological Reserve; and

Continued operation and use of previously established recreation sites in areas within the Title area.

Read More: Province and Tsilhqot’int nation sign accord

“These temporary authorizations allow specific activities to occur within our title land that benefit local residents, visitors, and businesses,” said Xeni Gwet’in (Nemiah Valley) Chief Jimmy Lulua. “We have a long way to go still and hope that a rejuvenated focus can be placed on meeting the basic needs of our community, our families, and our children.”

Scott Fraser, B.C.’s Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, said the landmark Tŝilhqot’in Decision raised a range of unique and complex questions the government is working with the Tŝilhqot’in National Government to implement the Supreme Court’s decision.

“These agreements highlight the continued collaboration between our two governments to provide more certainty and clarity around governance of activities on the Tŝilhqot’in territory,” Fraser said.

TNG tribal chairman Chief Joe Alphonse said the nation is looking for ways to provide certainty in the short term while working out long-term solutions.

“Unexpected delays and changes in government have been challenging, but we expect once certainty is established for community members and others that we can fully address the needs of our future.”

Read More: Tsilhqot’in community names officially recognized by Province

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

A map of declared title area. TNG file image

Just Posted

Cariboo female hockey players help make history at outdoor BC Winter Classic

Brette Kerley, Paige Outhouse, Pyper Alexander and goaltender Cadence Petitclerc-Crosby took part

EDITORIAL: Embrace literacy

Family Literacy Week is from Jan. 26 to Feb. 2

Cariboo air attack officer reports from Australia

“We are flying a lot, bombing fires anywhere from four to nine hours a day”

Retired teacher, coach set to release new book, Rugby Rivals

Rugby Rivals is targeted at youth aged 10 to 13, and tells the story of 14-year-old Sam Brewer

All Carlton Cards stores closing in the coming weeks

Schurman Retail Group stores across North America will close, including 79 in Canada

B.C.-based firefighting plane crashes in Australia, killing three

Three people are confirmed dead in the crash in New South Wales

Gap between cost of legal and illegal cannabis keeps growing: Stats Canada

In B.C., legal pot cost $9.32 per gram when bought legally

The word ‘landlord’ is too negative, one B.C. councillor says

Coun. Dave Loewen says term should be replaced by ‘rental housing provider’ in new housing strategy

Canada prepares as WHO decides whether to declare global coronavirus emergency

The city of Wuhan, China, has shut down outbound flights and trains

Survey finds support among Canadians for broader assisted-dying law

The survey was conducted Jan. 17 to 21 among 1,552 Canadians eligible to vote

Veteran B.C. journalist battles cancer through pioneering immunotherapy treatment

Vancouver Island rallies around JR Rardon and family during stay in Seattle

New nasal spray launched in Canada to combat hypoglycemic shock in diabetics

Baqsimi is a nasal spray contains three milligrams of glucagon

Prices for recreational marijuana in B.C. down from a year ago

New inflation figures show gasoline, housing and certain kinds of food cost more

B.C. RCMP spent roughly $750K on massive manhunt for Port Alberni men

Manitoba RCMP helped with 17-day search through the province’s northern terrain

Most Read