An orange, syringe and cartridge of water (in place of naloxone) were the learning tools mayor and council used Tuesday when learning how to administer naloxone. Monica Lamb-Yorski photos

Naloxone training on the agenda

Williams Lake mayor and council have learned how to administer naloxone

With a giant orange in one hand and an injection needle in the other, Williams Lake city councillors practiced administering naloxone Tuesday evening.

After hearing an opioid crisis presentation from Jordan Davis, Harm Reduction Co-ordinator with the Boys and Girls Club of Williams Lake, and RCMP Staff Sgt. Del Byron in January, council invited them to return to a committee of the whole meeting to show them first hand how to administer the opioid overdose reversal drug.

Read more: Williams Lake city councillors commit to overdose response training

Davis described what to do when it appears someone has overdosed.

“The first thing you are going to do is try to talk to them and if they don’t respond then we do what is called a sternum rub and press into the breast bone very firmly and call their name,” Davis explained. “If they have passed out from drinking, they might not fully respond, but they will give you some sort of response. If they don’t respond then you are going to assume they have overdosed.”

It is important to call 9-1-1 immediately because paramedics will need to attend, she advised.

Davis then demonstrated how to inject the drug.

“This is an intramuscular injection, which means it goes into a large muscle,” she said as she held up a needle, noting it’s always better to go into the thigh.

The needles, she explained, are called vanishing point syringes because they retract.

“They don’t need a sharp container to dispose of them so they are very safe.”

After the injection, it is important to continue to give the patient rescue breaths.

“You wait three to five minutes and if they still are not awake, you will go through the same process again,” she explained. “In each naloxone kit there are three syringes and three [cartridges] of naloxone.”

When asked by Coun. Jason Ryll if a person can receive too much naloxone, Davis responded, “no.”

“The worst thing that can happen is that it can make you feel a little bit nauseous,” she said. “Naloxone goes into the brain, takes the opioid off the brain and gives you 30 to 90 minutes to get them on an IV. They have to be on continuous naloxone until all their symptoms are gone. They have to go to the hospital.”

Read More: Chronic pain patients need options beyond opioids



news@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

One of several slides shown during a presentation to city council Tuesday during its committee of the whole meeting.

One of several slides shown during a presentation to city council Tuesday during its committee of the whole meeting.

Just Posted

Tommy Chong says cannabis legalization makes him proud to be a Canadian

Legendary marijuana advocate and comedian celebrates cultural milestone at Kelowna event

New Boitanio Park lamps shed light on the importance of utilizing the park

Six new lights have been installed in Boitanio Park to help illuminate and make the park safer.

Community Living Month celebration will take place at the Long House

Community Living Month was first proclaimed by the province in 2002

Beyond the Blues raises mental health awareness

At TRU last Thursday Beyond the Blues was held, raising awareness about mental health and wellness.

Forest management post wildfires, focus of Federation of BC Woodlot Associations AGM

More than 100 foresters came out of the woods to meet for two days to discuss what needs to change moving forward

Singer k.d. lang receives Alberta’s highest honour

Celebrated singer-songwriter k.d. lang received the Alberta Order of Excellence in Edmonton

B.C. tickets win big in Lotto Max draw

Jackpot carried over; B.C. tickets share Max Millions prizes

‘Mom, I’m in trouble:’ Canadian faces 10 years for alleged graffiti

Brittney Schneider, another tourist caught spraying message on walls of Tha Pae Gate in Thailand

Feds consulting on national anti-racism strategy behind closed doors

Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez says people still face systemic racism in some communities

Enbridge aims for mid-November to finish B.C. pipeline repair after blast

A natural gas pipeline that ruptured and burned near Prince George caused an explosion and fireball

How to get government cheques if Canada Post staff go on strike

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers said members could go on rotating strikes as early as Monday

Anti-SOGI school trustee files defamation lawsuit against BCTF president

Barry Neufeld says Glen Hansman’s words caused him “indignity,” “personal harassment,” and “anxiety”

Ocean ‘blob’ returns to B.C.’s North Coast

A 2,000 kilometre patch of warm ocean water could signal a warm winter in Prince Rupert

Most Read