Around $1.2 million has been awarded to various local governments within the Cariboo Fire Centre for wildlfire risk reduction efforts. (Monica Lamb-Yorski file photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Around $1.2 million has been awarded to various local governments within the Cariboo Fire Centre for wildlfire risk reduction efforts. (Monica Lamb-Yorski file photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Local governments in Cariboo Fire Centre benefit from wildfire risk reduction grants

Around $1.2 million in FireSmart Community funds coming to the region

Several wildfire risk reduction grants are coming to the Cariboo Fire Centre region.

Of almost $9 million announced by the province on Monday, about $1.2 million is slated for local governments in the region.

Canim Lake Band is getting $141,800 to assist with fuel management. ?Esdilagh First Nation will receive $40,000 for planning.

Esk’etemc First Nation will receive $201,098 to assist with cross-training, FireSmart demonstration projects and activities for private land and fuel management.

Read more: Pinnacle Renewable Energy and Esk’etemc First Nation ink three-year fibre deal

Lhatko Dené Nation will receive $30,000 for planning, while the City of Quesnel is getting $275,335 to assist with education, FireSmart activities for private land and fuel management.

Stwwecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation is receiving $12,000 to assist with fuel management.

The City of Williams Lake will receive $376,910 to assist with education, inter-agency co-operation, cross-training, FireSmart demonstration projects, FireSmart activiteies for private land and fuel management.

Williams Lake Indian Band will receive $75,000 to assist with development and Xeni Gwet’in First Nations will recieve $104,600 to assist with education, inter-agency co-operation, cross-training, Fire Smart activities for private land and fuel management.

Ravi Kahlon, Parliamentary Secretary for Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development, announced the third round of 89 Community Resiliency Investment grants during a visit to recipients in the Okanagan-Similkameen.

“The people who call these communities home know all too well the dangers from wildfires,” said Kahlon. “Our government is committed to supporting local governments and First Nations because it’s their on-the-ground efforts and local knowledge that are crucial to protecting the economic, recreational and environmental lifeblood of their communities.”

The Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) administers the Community Resiliency Investment program’s FireSmart Community Funding and Supports category and processes grant applications in partnership with the ministry and the First Nations’ Emergency Services Society of B.C.

Eligible applicants facing a lower wildfire risk can apply for up to $25,000, while applicants facing a demonstrated higher wildfire risk can apply for up to $150,000.

Read more: Cariboo-Chilcotin fire departments recipients of provincial funding



news@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter