Lawyer hails ‘fair and reasonable settlement’ in LGBTQ persecution case

Canadian government will deliver formal apology Tuesday

A lawyer for members of the military and other federal agencies who were investigated and sanctioned because of their sexual orientation says a hellish week of hard-fought negotiations led to a legal settlement.

In an interview today, Doug Elliott calls the agreement in principle a “fair and reasonable settlement.”

READ: Education minister blasts Chilliwack school trustee on gender issues

Elliott says the Liberal government’s plan to deliver a formal apology this Tuesday for wrongs perpetrated on the LGBTQ community put a lot of pressure on both sides to settle the lawsuit.

But Elliott adds he wasn’t prepared to take a bad deal, and the lead plaintiffs in the case are satisfied with the outcome — details of which will be announced at a news conference following the apology.

The federal government is also set to introduce legislation on Tuesday to expunge the criminal records of people convicted of consensual sexual activity with same-sex partners.

The overall scope of the government apology is expected to surpass what other countries have done to make amends to LGBTQ communities.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Williams Lake RCMP investigating robbery

General duty officers and police dog services responded to complaint just after midnight July 11

Williams Lake man to be sentenced for Dawson Creek drug trafficking

Arin Joe Charleyboy was charged in September 2016, pleaded guilty in January 2018

COLUMN: Economic renewal is key

COLUMN: Let’s keep our eye on economic renewal and support small business

RANCH MUSINGS: When the sun shines, kids and calves

It is not easy to witness the birth of a calf especially in a herd on a spacious pasture

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Bringing support to Indigenous students and communities, while fulfilling a dream

Mitacs is a nonprofit organization that operates research and training programs

Most Read