Tsilhqot’in youths Peyal Laceese (left) and Jasmine Quilt (centre) arrive on the Land Title Express in Williams Lake after journeying to Ottawa to hear the William case appeal in the Supreme Court. Tsilhqot’in National Chair Chief Joe Alphonse (right) gives former Xeni Gwet’in (Nemiah Valley) Chief Annie C. Williams a hug.

Tsilhqot’in youths Peyal Laceese (left) and Jasmine Quilt (centre) arrive on the Land Title Express in Williams Lake after journeying to Ottawa to hear the William case appeal in the Supreme Court. Tsilhqot’in National Chair Chief Joe Alphonse (right) gives former Xeni Gwet’in (Nemiah Valley) Chief Annie C. Williams a hug.

Land Title Express returns home

The Land Title Express returned to Williams Lake Thursday to a very warm welcome.

  • Nov. 15, 2013 6:00 p.m.

The welcome home the Indigenous Land Title Express received in Williams Lake Thursday was similar to the hospitality experienced from Williams Lake to Ottawa and back, said  Xeni Gwet’in (Nemiah) Chief Roger William.

“Before we knew it, the 16-day trip was over,” William said as he hugged his 11-year-old daughter Sierra in the Cariboo Memorial Complex where locals had prepared a welcoming feast.

“There were 24 of us on the trip,” William said. “Out of 24, we had 11 who testified in the original court case.

Stopping in each province, the group met with First Nations, doing ceremonies, drumming, prayers, sharing meals and gifts, he said.

“The support from First Nations across Canada was amazing.”

Even though it will be about six months for the Supreme Court to deliver a decision on the William rights and title case, William said the Tsilhqot’in are already feeling victory.

For more on this story check next week’s edition of the Tribune.