Yunesit’in Chief Russell Myers Ross, Tsilhqotin National Government tribal vice-chair (left) and Tsilhqot’in Nation Youth Cultural Ambassador Peyal Laceese during a peaceful protest held on Canada Day along Highway 20 and Farwell Canyon Road that prevented Taseko Mines Ltd. contractors from hauling heavy equipment in. This week in BC Supreme Court, a judge heard injunctions from both Taseko and the TNG regarding a drilling permit Taseko has for its proposed New Prosperity Mine project. Monica Lamb-Yorski photo

Judge hearing injunctions from Taseko and Tsilhqot’in Nation reserves judgment for September

Injunctions centred on Taseko’s permit to do exploratory drilling for its proposed New Prosperity Mine 185 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake

A B.C. Supreme Court judge hearing injunctions from Taseko Mines Ltd. and the Tsilhqot’in National Government regarding exploratory drilling for a proposed mine project in the province’s Interior will not give her judgment until the first week of September.

Hearings concluded on Wednesday, July 31, to hear Taseko’s application for an injunction to prohibit the Tsilhqot’in Nation and others from interfering with its drilling program at Teztan Biny (Fish Lake) about 185 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake for its proposed New Prosperity Mine project.

The Tsilhqot’in injunction asked to stop the drilling program until there can be a full trial to establish the drilling would infringe upon proven Aboriginal rights.

Taseko has agreed to stand down on the drilling program aside from non-disruptive work such as surveying.

Calling it positive news, the Tsilhqot’in Nation said it will continue to fight to protect “sacred lands” at Teztan Biny and Nabas (Little Fish Lake).

In 2017, Taseko was given a permit to do the exploratory drilling and immediately the Tsilhqot’in Nation filed an injunction to prevent it.

It has been a back and forth battle in court since then as well as on July 1, the Nation set up a peaceful protest along Highway 20 at the entrance to Farwell Canyon Road to prevent Taseko contractors from hauling heavy equipment through to the drilling location.

Read more: Tsilhqot’in Nation stops Taseko Mines exploratory drilling

Brian Battison, vice-president of corporate affairs for Taseko, said the company has no comment at this time.

The mine has been rejected through two Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency hearings in the past.



news@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Integra Tire moving commercial shop to Glendale

Renovations of former grocery store underway

Emergency crews respond to single vehicle crash in Williams Lake

City worker praised for quick first aid response

Quesnel RCMP investigating hit and run on Quesnel River Bridge

Bridge traffic reduced to single lane alternating

B.C. First Nation hopes to offer new visitor experiences in 2021

Travellers reminded to check for updates on access to Title Lands if visiting this summer

B.C. records 62 new COVID-19 cases, two deaths since Friday

Province has just over 200 active cases

Hotel rooms for B.C. homeless too hasty, NDP government told

Businesses forced out, but crime goes down, minister says

Wage subsidy will be extended until December amid post-COVID reopening: Trudeau

Trudeau said the extension will ‘give greater certainty and support to businesses’

B.C. government prepares for COVID-19 economic recovery efforts

New measures after July consultation, Carole James says

Tree planters get help with COVID-19 protective measures

Ottawa funds extra transportation, sanitizing for crews

Trudeau apologizes for not recusing himself from WE decision

He says his and his family’s longtime involvement with the WE organization should have kept him out of the discussions

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Most Read