Halloween great time to join BC community bat program

Community Bat projects across the province are hosting talks and events in association with Bat Week.

  • Oct. 27, 2017 10:55 a.m.

Options for encouraging healthy bat populations include preserving wildlife trees and wetlands, reducing pesticide use, or building and installing a bat house. Image submitted.

Mandy Kellner

Special to the Tribune/Advisor

As Halloween approaches, images of scary, blood-sucking bats become common place.

This is the perfect time of year to join with the BC Community Bat Program to counter these bat myths and do something to help bats.

“The conservation of bats in B.C. has always been important, since over half the species in this province are considered at risk,” says Mandy Kellner, co-ordinator for the BC Community Bat Program. “However, with the discovery of White-nose Syndrome in Washington State, bat conservation is more important than ever.”

White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a disease caused by an introduced fungus, first detected in North America in a cave in New York in 2006.

Since it was discovered, it has spread to 31 states and 5 provinces in North America, decimating bat populations along the way.

“Luckily, WNS is not yet in B.C.,” continues Kellner. “But we are preparing for its arrival by raising awareness about bats, working with landowners who have bats in buildings, enhancing bat habitat, and monitoring populations.”

Community Bat projects across the province are hosting talks and events in association with Bat Week (October 24 – 31) to provide information and guidance on ways to help bats.

Contact your local bat project to learn about events in your area. Monitoring for WNS will continue this winter, with the Community Bat Program requesting reports of dead bats or sightings of winter bat activity. You can report winter sightings at www.bcbats.ca or call 1-855-922-2287.

Options for encouraging healthy bat populations include preserving wildlife trees and wetlands, reducing pesticide use, or building and installing a bat house.

With the decline of natural roost sites, some bat species have adapted to using human-made structures, such as bat-houses. These small boxes have several crevices inside that provide a safe, dry habitat where bats can roost during summer months. “Bat-houses are particularly important for maternity colonies where groups of female bats roost together to have their pup during the summer” states Kellner. “A well-designed bat-house installed in a good location can provide a home for hundreds of bats.”

In partnership with the BC Ministry of Environment, and funded by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation and Habitat Stewardship Program, the BC Community Bat Program provides information about bats in buildings, conducts site visits to advise landowners on managing bats in buildings, coordinates the Annual Bat Count, and offers educational programs on bats. To find out more about the BC Community Bat Program, or download bat-house plans, visit www.bcbats.ca or call or 1-855-922-2287.

Mandy Kellner is the provincial lead on the BC Community Bat Program.

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