Food action co-ordinators with the Food Policy Council Cody Slin (left) and Michelle Daymond (right) along with Marg Evans and Tatjana Bates in April at the site of the community garden.

Food action co-ordinators with the Food Policy Council Cody Slin (left) and Michelle Daymond (right) along with Marg Evans and Tatjana Bates in April at the site of the community garden.

Ground breaks for Memory Garden July 28

The memory garden located on Carson Drive below Williams Lake Secondary School will have a ground breaking ceremony on July 28.

  • Jul. 16, 2012 7:00 p.m.

The memory garden located on Carson Drive below Williams Lake Secondary School will have a ground breaking ceremony on July 28 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

At a committee of the whole meeting July 10, council received an update from Cody Slinn and Michelle Daymond, food action co-ordinators with the Food Policy Council.

Slin told council future plans for the 25,000-square-foot site, including erecting a fence, building 40 raised beds, and erecting two greenhouses, a composting centre and a community root cellar.

Fencing would keep deer out and act as a sound barrier and a visual boundary.

“We also want to offer on-site gardening lessons,” Slin said.

The name for the garden was created two years ago by students from the high school. The incentive being that the community garden would be a place were great memories would be made.

This summer energy will be focused building the garden, putting in a cover crop, but growing in 2013.

“There’s a lot of soil improvement that needs to be done there,” Daymond said.

So far funds for the garden have come from the Williams Lake & District Credit Union ($3,000), United Way ($18,000), and a grant-in-aid from the city ($3,000).

One of the stumbling blocks has been obtaining insurance, due to its cost.

“It’s a high risk because there’s no history with community gardens. Insurance companies see them as public spaces,” Daymond explained, adding throughout the entire history of the community garden located beside Cariboo Lodge, there’s only been one turnip stolen and no vandalism.

As the Food Policy Council looks further down the road, it will continue to research insurance costs, involve students in the project, and partner with the local arts community.

“We will be writing proposals and fundraising. The vision is to create beauty and gather community,” Slinn said, adding the group has a landscape designer helping them draw up an official layout for the garden.