Cariboo Regional District manager of development services Karen Moores tells the board at its regular meeting Friday that animal control requests are the number one complaint received by the CRD’s bylaw office

Cariboo Regional District manager of development services Karen Moores tells the board at its regular meeting Friday that animal control requests are the number one complaint received by the CRD’s bylaw office

CRD pursues possible animal control bylaw for Quesnel fringe area

Complaints about animal control are the most commonly received by the Cariboo Regional District’s bylaw office.

Complaints about animal control are the most commonly received by the Cariboo Regional District’s bylaw office, even though it isn’t a service the CRD provides.

In a report to the CRD board about the bylaw office’s activities in 2014, manager of development services Karen Moores said of the 183 files received, 42 were for animal complaints.

Most animal complaints are about large and aggressive animals, primarily dogs, but may involve cattle, she explained.

Two CRD directors, however, are hoping that animal control can be offered to their constituents.

Because of aggressive dog complaints director Ted Armstrong asked the CRD staff Friday to bring back a report on what it might take to develop an animal control bylaw for dogs at large in the Kersley and Red Bluff areas.

Armstrong also requested a letter be sent to the City of Quesnel inquiring about the city’s ability to provide animal control services, perhaps by a contract.

Upon hearing Armstrong’s request, Area I director Dylan Cash asked if his area could be included if an arrangement is made with the City of Quesnel.

“I have had a number of people in my area as well express interest in some type of dog control, mainly in the Quesnel fringe area, generally within the subdivisions and more densely populated areas.”

The board unanimously endorsed the two directors’ request.

Chair Al Richmond said 20-plus years ago the CRD held a referendum on animal control for 108 Mile, but it was defeated.

“We had a very in-depth community petition, but when the people who asked for it found out how much it was going to cost, they defeated it,” Richmond said. “It was really very surprising.”

Area D director Steve Forseth said there’s an elevated issue with dogs in his area as well.

“Some of my constituents would like to look at some sort of animal control bylaw down the road,” Forseth told the board.

Bylaw Enforcement, which remains complaint driven, has primarily focused on initiating enforcement of building inspection, solid waste management, invasive plant management and water management bylaws.

Additionally in 2014, approximately 35 sites were identified as building without a permit and were attended by a building official and some of these site visits were accompanied with a bylaw enforcement officer.

Bylaw Enforcement also partnered with solid waste management services to create a presence at various transfer stations during their conversion to controlled sites.

“The intent was to provide education to the public about the bylaw and assist the operators with problem clients,” a CRD press release noted.  “In 2014, bylaw enforcement also provided assistance to the invasive plant management crews with one file that received notice and will continue to co-ordinate with crews in 2015.”