CRD brings recycling depots to rural areas

Several new recycling depots are being eyed for the region, said Tera Grady, supervisor of solid waste management for the CRD.

Several new recycling depots are being eyed for the region, said Tera Grady, supervisor of solid waste management for the Cariboo Regional District during a report to the board during its regular meeting Friday.

“The sites identified for the new stations are Horsefly, Nimpo Lake and Tatla Lake because of their proximity to existing depots, provided there is someone in each of those communities willing to manage the contract,” Grady said, noting discussions with Multi-Material BC have resulted in the CRD receiving permission to add the new depots in 2016.

A new depot opened in Wells last Saturday that is being run by the Wells and Area Community Association, the successful bidder for the contract.

“Community members I’ve talked to are very excited about having the access in their community,” Grady said, noting the Wells station will operate Saturdays and Sundays for three hours in the winter and possibly five hours in the summer months.

Recently the CRD has developed a brand for promotion, education and advertising.

“Our tagline ‘The Cariboo Cares’ is fairly simple and easy to incorporate and we can use it on any material we use in regards to solid waste,” Grady said.

Staff have also developed three other types of signage that will be displayed at the CRD’s various sites, to thank people for reducing, reusing and recycling.

A white board section on some of the signs will be used to update the public on how many tons are being recycled on a monthly basis at each site.

“Many people don’t know we are getting paid for our recyclables now, it’s taking away from a cost to us and we are actually receiving funds,” Grady said.

The CRD has also ordered 7,000 new rear-view mirror ID tags for the Lone Butte and Interlakes refuge sites.

In the new year, access to both of the sites will be limited, and only CRD residents will be permitted to use them, although traveling public won’t be excluded.

Tourists and people camping in the area are being encouraged to use the sites, but attendants will discourage anyone from outside the region using the sites as a dumping zone, Grady said.