Speed reader data collected between March 1 and April 28, 2021 indicated 94.68 per cent of vehicles traveling through kept below or to the 50 km hour speed limit. (Angie Mindus file photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Speed reader data collected between March 1 and April 28, 2021 indicated 94.68 per cent of vehicles traveling through kept below or to the 50 km hour speed limit. (Angie Mindus file photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

City council agrees further speed restrictions not warranted for Westridge area of Williams Lake

Staff bases decision on speed reader data collected over six-week period

Speed reader data obtained in the Westridge area of Williams Lake over a six-week period this spring revealed 94 per cent of the traffic kept within the speed limit and approximately 98 per cent drove less than 10 kilometres an hour over the posted speed.

City council received the information at its regular meeting Tuesday, May 11.

In October 2020, Tyrel Skinner on behalf of Westridge area residents made a presentation during a committee of the whole meeting where he submitted a petition requesting speed controls measures be put in place.

Read more: Westridge parents raise concerns over speeding in subdivision

In a report city council received Tuesday, municipal services co-ordinator Cindy Walters noted the data was collected between March 1 and April 22, 2021.

The speed reader showed that 215,641 vehicles travelled at zero to 50 km an hour, 9,838 travelled between 51 to 55 km an hour, 1,873 travelled at 56 to 60 km an hour and 417 travelled at greater than 61 km an hour.

“Based on these results, the speeds recorded would not warrant substantial traffic calming infrastructure under the city’s typical practices,” Walters noted in the report.

Council authorized sending a letter to Skinner advising that no further action will be taken at this time, however, the RCMP will be requested to do additional patrols of the area.

Coun. Craig Smith, however, said there were still 417 people driving more than 61 km an hour which was a concern.

“It was minimal and just a six week time period, but there was no data saying how fast they were going,” Smith said.

Responding chief administrative officer Gary Muraca said there is tons of raw data that did show there were “some” cars doing 100 km an hour.

“That was in the middle of the night and could possibly be equated to RCMP officers responding to a call or emergency services, but it was negligible numbers,” Muraca said.

Coun. Sheila Boehm noted the speed limit of 50 km hour is fast for a residential area.

Westridge is a tight residential area, Coun. Scott Nelson said.

“There are a lot of families that live up there and I think what is important to recognize is that at the end of the day is that the courteous thing is to be considerate and watch for the traffic within your area. There are a lot of young kids in these areas.”

The data shows that people are speeding in a residential area, Nelson added.

“We are encouraging people, whether they live in that area or not, to take the foot off the gas a little bit to make sure it’s a little bit safer.”



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