Boy overdosed on illicit anti-anxiety drug found on Kelowna classroom floor, RCMP say

Noah Mills, 8, ingested a pink powdery substance off his Kelowna classroom floor

The drug an eight-year-old consumed off a Kelowna classroom floor, causing the child short-term impairment, has now been identified as an illicit kind of benzodiazepines.

The class of medication, commonly called benzos, are psychoactive drugs used to treat a range of conditions, including anxiety and insomnia. Prescriptions can include drugs such as xanax, valium, ativan and clonazepam.

Overdoses caused by such drugs cannot be reversed by the naloxone, the antidote used widely to temporarily reverse opioid overdoses.

Jeremy Mills, father of Noah, said his son found the substance on the floor of his classroom at A.S. Matheson elementary last Wednesday, ingested it and was subsequently unable to speak or talk for hours.

The Grade 3 student was rushed to the hospital after consuming the substance, but multiple tests came back negative, Mills said.

The drug was able to be identified when it was found on the classroom floor of A.S. Matheson on Thursday morning and sent for testing.

READ MORE: ‘Benzos’ and fentanyl a deadly cocktail causing a growing concern on B.C. streets

“We were just glad to know what it was,” Mills said. “It’s a mixed reaction. I’m glad it’s nothing that requires post-medical care. There’s no detox or more procedures, so that’s good.”

While the results are much of a relief, Mills still has concerns about how the drug got into an elementary school classroom.

“From what we know it’s not laced with fentanyl, but it’s still an illegal street drug that shouldn’t be in the hands of an eight-year-old,” Mills said.

“What do we do to ensure this doesn’t happen again? It’s frightening to know this can happen,” he said.

The origins of the drug and how it entered the classroom remain unknown and Kelowna RCMP is continuing its investigation.

Police encourage anybody with information to contact the local detachment at 250-762-3300.

The principal of the elementary school spoke to the students in the class to ease the student’s return, help the young students understand the incident, and remind the children about safety around unknown substances.


@Niftymittens14
daniel.taylor@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

PHOTOS: WLST prepares farcical Roman musical for January

A comedic musical romp entitled A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is coming soon

EDITORIAL: A community Christmas story

Imagining a town where people shop locally

Bowlers land medals at youth 5-pin zone championships

Cariboo Bowling Lanes in Williams Lake was bustling with activity last Sunday

Christmas comes early to the Salvation Army in Williams Lake

City Furniture has donated all the food for the Salvation Army Christmas Dinner

Williams Lake rallies to help with dog’s surgery costs

Dobby, 6, needs perineal hernia surgery, owner cannot afford the vet bill

VIDEO: These are the top toys this Christmas, B.C. toy experts say

Consider the play value of a game, staff at Toy Traders say

Prince George RCMP use bait packages to catch porch pirates over the holidays

First-in-Canada program with Amazon looks to combat parcel theft

Nanaimo mechanical engineer creates thief tracking program

Nanaimo Thief Tracking lets users plot and share information about thefts online

Mayor wants B.C. to institutionalize severely mental ill people who are homeless

Those suffering from mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia, need specialized care, mayor says

Five things of note from Trudeau’s mandate letters to his ministers

Some marching orders come from the Liberal Party’s campaign, while others are new additions

Scheer’s resignation tips party into internal war over school tuition payments

The Conservatives have a Toronto convention already scheduled for April

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Most Read