B.C. to advocate for frustrated, confused, unhappy cellphone users, says premier

Maple Ridge New Democrat Bob D’Eith to advocate for more affordable and transparent cellphone options

A cellphone users survey shows British Columbia residents are frustrated and confused with cellphone contracts and billing, prompting a deeper review of consumer protection laws and expanded efforts to push the federal government for improvements.

Premier John Horgan has appointed Maple Ridge New Democrat Bob D’Eith to advocate for more affordable and transparent cellphone options.

D’Eith says a recent government survey about cellphone issues received more than 15,000 responses from people wanting easy-to-understand contracts, transparent bills and affordable plans.

The New Democrats promised in last February’s throne speech to provide consumers with tools to receive the least expensive service possible.

D’Eith says cellphone issues are largely subject to federal regulations, but that will not stop the province from lobbying Ottawa to make affordability and transparency improvements.

He says the B.C. government will embark on a deeper examination of cellphone issues, including a legislative review of the province’s consumer protection laws to ensure users are familiar with their rights and protections.

The Canadian Press

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