B.C. First Nation to present oral evidence about Trans Mountain expansion impact

National Energy Board hearings take place in Nanaimo this week

The Tsleil-Waututh Nation will be presenting Indigenous oral traditional evidence to the National Energy Board at a hearing in Nanaimo, B.C.

A news release says the board is hearing new evidence about the environmental effects of Trans Mountain pipeline expansion including adverse effects of shipping to species at risk such as southern resident killer whales.

RELATED: Energy board to hear traditional Indigenous evidence in Trans Mountain review

The oral traditional evidence will focus on potential impacts the project would pose to the Tsleil-Waututh culture and way of life, including their cultural relationships with whales, and how the expansion, if approved, would violate Tsleil-Waututh laws.

The Tsleil-Waututh will also file scientific expert reports with the board as evidence regarding potential impacts from shipping.

Chief Maureen Thomas says the expansion violates the First Nation’s laws and poses serious and harmful impacts to Tsleil-Waututh people and culture, as well to as their lands, waters, resources, and way of life.

RELATED: NEB wants to hear your thoughts on Trans Mountain pipeline

The new hearings are being held after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed the original approval for the expansion, saying the federal government didn’t adequately consult with First Nations or consider the impact of tanker traffic on the marine environment.

The Canadian Press

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