Onyx the cat had his leg amputated after being shot with a pellet gun in Nanoose Bay. (BC SPCA photo)

B.C. cat’s leg amputated after being shot with pellet gun

SPCA seeks help with medical costs after Vancouver Island incident

  • Mar. 5, 2019 3:30 p.m.

The BC SPCA’s Parksville-Qualicum Beach & District Branch is seeking the public’s assistance with medical costs for a two-year-old tabby cat named Onyx, who was shot by a pellet gun last week in Nanoose Bay.

His owners brought him to a veterinary clinic, but were forced to surrender him due to the cost of the surgery, estimated at just more than $1,800.

Onyx had a pellet and shrapnel lodged in his leg, according to branch manager Nadine Durante. His injuries were severe and he required a leg amputation.

“He’s a very sweet cat,” said Durante, who said he will spend several weeks in foster care before being adopted out into a new home.

READ MORE: Animals scared but unharmed after break-in at Parksville SPCA branch

Duranted noted it is “very concerning” that someone is using a pellet gun on animals.

Anyone with information regarding this or other animal cruelty incidents can call 1-855-622-7722. If anyone wishes to help Onyx and other animals in need at the Parksville-Qualicum Beach SPCA, please visit spca.bc.ca/medicalemergency or visit the branch at 1565 Alberni Highway, Parksville (250-248-3811).

The BC SPCA is a non-profit organization funded primarily by public donations.

— NEWS Staff

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