A photograph of Mica Mountain submitted in an avalanche report on Avalanche Canada’s website is an example of information backcountry users are sharing.

A photograph of Mica Mountain submitted in an avalanche report on Avalanche Canada’s website is an example of information backcountry users are sharing.

Avalanche reporting improves safety

Backcountry enthusiasts in the Cariboo are sharing up-to-date information from the region.

Backcountry enthusiasts in the Cariboo are sharing up-to-date information from the region on Avalanche Canada’s Mountain Information Network.

Herb Butters of 150 Mile House recently entered data on the site about two avalanches he witnessed on Sunday at Big Timothy Mountain, an area popular with snowmobilers.

“They were two fairly large avalanches, but it was more uncommon where they were than seeing them,” Butters said.

Another person reported two slides on the north side of Mount Elsey on Saturday, resulting in snow burying trees and reaching the bottom of the valley.

Using words such as “whumpfing, drum-like sounds or shooting cracks,” people provide descriptions of what they saw.

Photographs are also shared on the site such as the ones Val Severin, provided when she reported avalanches in the Mica Mountain area.

Butters encouraged others to share information on the website.

“The more reports, the more accurate of a forecast Avalanche Canada can come up with,” he said.

The Mountain Information Network is a free online exchange forum using coloured icons on a  main map.

Submitting detailed observations is easy with pre-formatted reports and the information shared helps people make better decisions in avalanche terrain, Avalanche Canada notes.

For more information on the MIN, check out the overview page at avalanche.ca.