Three members of mayor and council have indicated their intentions for the 2018 municipal election. Monica Lamb-Yorski photo

Mayor and two councillors confirm 2018 election intentions

Mayor Cobb and Coun. Craig Smith plan to run in October’s election, while Coun. Sue Zacharis has said she won’t.

So far it isn’t a quorum – the number of Williams Lake city councillors who have declared whether or not they will seek re-election in the Oct. 20 municipal election.

Mayor Walt Cobb confirmed in November he plans to run again.

Coun. Sue Zacharias announced in December she won’t seek a fourth term.

This week, when councillors were canvassed by the Tribune, Coun. Craig Smith was the only one who confirmed that he plans to run again.

Holding their cards close to their chests, councillors Ivan Bonnell, Scott Nelson, Laurie Walters and Jason Ryll said it was too early to make any public announcements about their plans.

Anyone wanting to run for council, however, has time to give it serious consideration.

The City’s chief election officer Cindy Bouchard said nomination packages will first be made available on July 27 and open for submissions from Sept. 4 to Sept. 14 at 4 p.m.

“It does not cost anything to submit a nomination, and people wanting to run don’t have to live within the city limits, but to nominate someone you have to live within the city limits and be on the registered voters list,” Bouchard explained, noting each nomination requires the endorsement of two registered voters.

Bouchard encouraged people thinking about running to consider the amount of time it takes to be on city council.

“By the time you add it all up, it’s the equivalent of two or three days of full-time work a week,” she said. “There’s nothing worse than having someone get elected who doesn’t understand that.”

Smith echoed Bouchard, saying it it is a part-time job.

“You have to be interested and want to better the community,” Smith said. “Meeting times alone are 10 to 12 hours a week with council meetings, special meetings, committee meetings and other commitments. Each of those meetings can be anywhere from one to four hours long.”

In addition to meetings there is the time it takes to prepare for meetings.

“The biggest agenda I ever had was 650 pages long,” Smith explained. “You are doing your colleagues and the city a disservice if you are not prepared for a meeting. If you don’t sit and go through the entire agenda package before your meeting you are not going to be able to add anything intelligent to the discussion.”

Smith said people often tell him they don’t have time to serve on city council, but as a guy running four businesses, taking university courses and finding time to walk with his dog every day, Smith thinks people can find the time if they want to.

“It’s about priorities,” he added.

When asked what he’s learned, Smith said the realization that as a councillor you might think you are going to make huge changes, but really you are part of a decision-making body and your vote is one in seven.

Read More: Williams Lake city councillor will not seek re-election in 2018

Read More: Mayor Cobb looks back on 2017

Just Posted

Trumpeter Donnie Clark returning to Williams Lake

Donnie Clark is one of Canada’s leading trumpet and flugelhorn players.

Bus company eyeing passenger and cargo service departing from Williams Lake, stopping in Quesnel

Merritt Bus Shuttle Services Ltd. would have a driver based in Williams Lake for the route to Prince George

Williams Lake city council settles for $5 airport passenger facility fee increase

Originally council was debating establishing a $10 airport improvement fee

Rain, sleet and snow arrives in the Cariboo

Freezing rain in the forecast overnight

Pinettes land medals early at PanAm Waterski Championships

Parnell and Lucas Pinette have skied to medals so far at the PanAm Waterski Championships

UPDATE: West Fraser to permanently reduce production in Quesnel, Fraser Lake

The move, due to log supply shortages, will affect 75 employees in Quesnel, 60 in Fraser Lake

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

B.C. dog owner sues after pet killed in beaver trap

A Kamloops man is suing the operator of a trapline north of the city after his dog died

Heading soccer balls can cause damage to brain cells: UBC study

Roughly 42 per cent of children in the country play soccer, according to statistics from Heritage Canada

Supreme Court hears case on migrant detainees’ rights to challenge incarceration

Currently, migrants who do not hold Canadian citizenship can only challenge detention through an immigration tribunal or a judicial review.

Canada Post issues new offer to employees as eBay calls on Ottawa to end strikes

Ebay is calling on the federal government to legislate an end to the Canada Post contract dispute, warning that quick action is needed to ensure retailers don’t lose out on critical Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales.

No G20 member has climate plan strong enough to meet Paris targets: report

Canada’s push to be a world leader in the fight against climate change may be hampered by its distinction for producing the most greenhouse gas emissions per person among the world’s 20 largest economies.

Talent show: B.C. girl, 8, memorizes entire periodic table

Grade 4 student Maya Lakhanpal heads to B.C. talent show finals with unique talent

Most Read