It’s official: B.C.’s civic election campaign period kicks off

New spending, expense limits are in place

And so it begins: the municipal election campaign period is officially underway.

While candidates in many cities across B.C. had announced their intention to run over the summer months, the province’s newly shortened campaign period began this weekend.

In addition to being almost 20 days shorter compared to the 2014 campaign period, this year’s candidates will have much stricter spending limits.

Candidate rules

This go time around, union and corporate donations are banned altogether, and individual donations have a $1,200 limit.

Candidate spending has been strictly curtailed. In cities under 10,000 people, mayoral candidates may spend $10,000, while all other candidates are left with $5,000 to spend.

For cities over 10,000 people, Elections BC will use a per-capita formula. For example, mayoral candidates in Vancouver have a $210,174.60 spending limit, those in Victoria will get $54,121.50 and those in Surrey will have $195,234.90.

Elector organizations, or slates, will not get their own spending limits. Instead, candidates can sign over some of their expenses to their slate and it will spend the money on the candidate’s behalf.

Advertising limits

New rules on directed and issue advertising have come into effect. For communities of under 15,000 people, the directed advertising limit is $750.

Candidates in communities with populations over 15,000 will have a directed advertising limit equal to five per cent of the mayoral candidates expense limit in that electoral area.

For non-area specific issue advertising, the limit is $150,000.

Third-party advertisers will also have an overall limit of $150,000 for issue and directed advertisement across the entire province.

There are currently 28 third party sponsor organizations and three individuals registered.

British Columbians head to the polls on Oct. 20.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Search for missing mushroom picker activated in Anahim Lake area

The mushroom picker is from Ulkatcho First Nation

DOWN TO EARTH: Earth friendly choices challenging, but rewarding

Amber Gregg Special to the Tribune/Advisor Recently I made the decision to… Continue reading

RANCH MUSINGS: Is there insurance against nature delivering surprises to agriculture producers?

There is much talk about producers being resilient in their responses to… Continue reading

Feldinger selected as one of four recipients of new BC Rugby bursary

Asked about receiving the bursary, Feldinger said she was extremely grateful.

Speaking up for resource communities topic of #TheNorthMatters meeting in Williams Lake Sunday

“No one’s here to cause a problem,” Barnett said. “We’re here to solve a problem.”

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

Safety concerns resurface after fatal bus crash on Vancouver Island

Huu-ay-aht First Nations wants a safe route between Bamfield and Port Alberni

National weather forecasters predict average fall, cold winter

The Weather Network says precipitation will about average in most parts of Canada

Two dead, two in critical condition in highway crash near Campbell River

Highway 19 reopened Sunday night after it was closed in both directions

VIDEO: Vancouver Island mayor details emergency response after fatal bus crash

Sharie Minions says she is ‘appalled’ by condition of road where bus crashed

Federal party leaders address gun violence after weekend shooting near Toronto

One teen was killed and five people injured in the shooting

Conservatives promise tax cut that they say will address Liberal increases

Scheer says the cut would apply to the lowest income bracket

B.C. VIEWS: Cutting wood waste produces some bleeding

Value-added industry slowly grows as big sawmills close

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Some say the high cost of logs is the major cause of the industry’s decline in B.C.

Most Read