Artist Betty Kovacic poses in front of three of the pieces on display in her May main gallery show, “Connections.” The show focuses on a theme of interconnectivity, and the three paintings Kovacic is standing next to in this image each showcase a different element: earth, air and water. Tara Sprickerhoff photo

Interwoven connections theme of Station House May show

Silhouettes, geometric shapes, letters, words and numbers are interwovenin the main gallery

Silhouettes, geometric shapes, letters, words and numbers are interwoven through the artwork in the main gallery at the Station House this month.

The shapes and designs build on each other, linking piece to piece, and yet each tells a different story.

The show is called “Connections” and is a collection of work by Prince George artist Betty Kovacic.

“Connections is about the ways that we as citizens of the world are connected to each other and to other living creatures who are citizens of the world. It’s also about the way we are connected to the world itself,” said Kovacic.

It’s a topic Kovacic started exploring many years ago, with one of the art pieces on display.

It connects earth, at the bottom to water and air at the top.

“I was thinking about how it is all connected and how those are essential to life.”

In one of the sets, three pieces, on their own, represent earth, air and water.

Using the lettering common to much of her work, Kovacic has interwoven the chemicals that go into making air, the things you find in earth and the composition of water, as well as plastic – “hugely impactful to our oceans and water” – in the third.

In the third, a dolphin is connected by strands of an umbilical cord to a baby.

“Again, I am talking about commonality and not differences. Even through we look like we are terribly different, we start our life in water,” said Kovacic.

Silhouettes are also a common device Kovacic uses through many of her pieces.

“The silhouette is stripped of anything that identifies it. It is stripped of gender, sexual orientation, religious belief – anything that identifies it as someone specific. Yet, to acknowledge that everyone is specific and individual every silhouette is created in a different way,” said Kovacic.

“By using the silhouette I felt I could address it as a global language, so that the image could pertain to anyone, any human being, and yet also how it pertains to human beings as it references and is informed by anything else that is part of our world.”

Each piece has a story, said Kovacic, if you know where to look.

Some are smaller, simple, like one that showcases an injured waxwing she brought into her home, while others are a general message about the world around us: shared strength; solitude; elephants saying “I am. I am here.”

“We are all one huge community,” said Kovacic. “We don’t even know how we or our actions are impacting other areas.”

It’s a message also reflected in the text found in her work.

“It references that even with all of our knowledge and all of our communication, sometimes we still don’t hear each other. Text is about communication and sometimes the lack thereof, and so to me it is also about patterns, about the exploration of aesthetics, about fitting in other bits of information.

Kovacic’s pieces are made in a variety of mediums. Most start out on paper, with Indian ink but also incorporate charcoal, water colour, graphite, colour pencil and paint.

“When I start this work I have no idea how it’s going to work,” said Kovacic. “And then it develops as it goes, intuitively and, one can hope, with years of working knowledge and all of that comes together.”

Her drawings, she said, are very different than her paintings.

“It’s almost like a meditation and I just let it evolve.”

Still, the theme running through her work is evident.

Kovacic quotes Margaret Mead in some of her messaging: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

It’s part of what she hopes to show with her work.

“We have more in common than we do have differences,” she said.

“There is really a lot of detail within each piece and I think that if people take the time to look and think about it and think about how everything could come together, they could make their own stories as well.”

 

Geometric shapes, words and silhouettes are common in Kovacic’s pieces, which will be on display at the Station House Gallery until the end of May.

Just Posted

Farmers Market sees successful start to season

More vendors expected as veggies and fruit start to ripen

Gallery: Kid’s Bike Parade

Williams Lake bicycle festival carries into the weekend

Bicycle Festival pedals into Williams Lake

Plenty of activities - for bicyclers and non-bicyclers - through weekend

Tsilhqot’in community names officially recognized by Province

Tsilhqot’in names will now appear on provincial government resources, maps and databases

Indian Horse audiobook narrated by Williams Lake city councillor

Jason Ryll is the voice of Saul Indian Horse in a new audiobook

VIDEO: Grand Forks shores up defences as floodwaters rise to peak levels

Canadian Forces, volunteers working to protect low-lying areas

Chilliwack Chiefs moving on to RBC Cup final after thrilling win over Ottawa

Kaden Pickering scored the winning goal in the 3rd period as Chilliwack won their semi-final 3-2.

VIDEO: As floodwaters recede, crews assess the damage to Grand Forks’ downtown

More than four dozen firefighters and building inspectors came out to help

Wellington Dukes pull off epic upset of Wenatchee at RBC Cup

The Dukes are off to the championship game after downing the Wild 2-1 Saturday at Prospera Centre.

Canada to face U.S. for bronze at world hockey championship

Canada was looking to play in the gold medal game for a fourth straight year, but saw 3-2 loss

Searchers for Vancouver Island father turn focus to Cowichan River

Cowichan SAR joined by many other SAR groups, volunteers now determined to find missing man

Vacationers urged to check for stowaway bats that could carry deadly disease

‘White-nose syndrome’ has killed millions of bats in North America, but hasn’t arrived in B.C. yet

Are B.C.’s gas prices enough to keep you from travelling May long weekend?

Gas prices in B.C. ranging from 125 cents per litre to more than 150 cents

Prince Harry, Meghan Markle wed in Windsor as millions watch

Windsor sparkled on a warm spring day as tens of thousands of people jammed its quaint roads

Most Read