The Williams Lake Film Club screens the Quebec film Gabrielle at the Gibraltar Room Tuesday. Gabrielle is played by Gabrielle Marion-Rivard.

The Williams Lake Film Club screens the Quebec film Gabrielle at the Gibraltar Room Tuesday. Gabrielle is played by Gabrielle Marion-Rivard.

Gabrielle next up Tuesday for film club

Film club to screen Gabrielle the Québecois film premiered at the Whistler Film Festival and now on its way to the Vancouver Film Festival.

For our next film we were fortunate to get permission to show you the brand new release of Gabrielle, a Québecois film, which had its premiere at the Whistler Film Festival and is now on its way to the Vancouver Film Festival.

In between it was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film for the Oscars.

We will be screening Gabrielle next Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the Gibraltar Room at 7 p.m., back doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Gabrielle is a young woman with Williams syndrome (in real life as well) who has a contagious joy in life and an exceptional musical gift.

Since she met her boyfriend Martin at the recreation centre where they are choir members, they have become inseparable.

However, because they are “different,” developmentally disabled, their loved ones are fearful of their relationship.

Questions arise, i.e. has Gabrielle been sterilized?

The choir where Gabrielle and Martin sing is part of a real performance arts school for people with disabilities, Les Muses.

Many of the students and teachers play themselves in the film.

Les Muses is also taking part in a huge choir event held annually in Montréal.

This year Gabrielle’s class is practicing for a summer performance with the legendary Québecois singer-songwriter Robert Charlebois.

What a treat that is, to see and hear them working together.

Gabrielle is a rare film in that it depicts the relationships between developmentally challenged and “regular” people without condescension or sappiness.

Everyone is struggling with their lives. It is especially refreshing to see the connection between Gabrielle and her sister, who goes through all the emotions – love for her often difficult sister, frustration, and guilt.

It is so honest, neither sentimental nor subtle, definitely not always politically correct. Writer-director Louise Archambault has done a remarkable piece of work.

See you Tuesday, January 28, at the Gibraltar Room. I am sure you will love meeting Gabrielle.

Admission is $9 regular, $8 for Film Club members, and $6 for seniors (65+) and students, HS and TRU.