Vicky Reynolds enjoys creating stone boards with a simple design. She was one of the vendors at the Women’s Wellness Fair held Saturday, April 23 at Thompson Rivers University Williams Lake campus. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Vicky Reynolds enjoys creating stone boards with a simple design. She was one of the vendors at the Women’s Wellness Fair held Saturday, April 23 at Thompson Rivers University Williams Lake campus. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Women’s wellness fair features local vendors, promotes healthy living

Women’s Contact Society’s Eileen Alberton said about 200 people attended

The Women’s Contact Society hosted a successful Women’s Wellness Fair on Saturday, April 23.

This year it was held at Thompson Rivers University Williams Lake campus and featured just over 40 local vendors and organizations.

From home-based businesses, to advice on how to improve your life expectancy through diet and exercise, or sign up for yoga classes through zoom, it was an opportunity for people to socialize and be reminded of what the Williams Lake area has to offer.

There was also a stage featuring local performers.

Organizer Eileen Alberton said it went well and close to 200 people attended.

“Considering it was one of the first really nice weekends we had, weather-wise, and the fact it’s one of the first events after being on restrictions, it was good. It would have been nice to have more traffic, but it was our first time in that venue.”

Alberton said she could have crammed more vendors in the market, but as the restrictions have just started to ease, she did not want to take any chances.

Looking to next year she would hold it at TRU.

“I think sound is always a big problem, and there were people at the back of the hall who could not hear the entertainment so next year we will see if we can access technology to make it better,” Alberton said.

This week Alberton and a number of staff who helped her will meet this week to debrief and go over the fair.

“I had some great help and volunteers that I will keep for next time.”

Alberton saw one of the service providers she’d only met virtually through the pandemic as she started working at the Women’s Contact Society in September 2019.

“I said to her ‘do you realize this is the first time we’ve actually met in person.?’ It was a sign of the times and kind of cool.”



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