Walk to End ALS in Williams Lake raises roughly $12,000

Freya Brown (from left), Shane Schmidt and Ronan McConkey carry the Walk to End ALS banner during the annual Williams Lake walk on Saturday, June 19. (Photo submitted)Freya Brown (from left), Shane Schmidt and Ronan McConkey carry the Walk to End ALS banner during the annual Williams Lake walk on Saturday, June 19. (Photo submitted)
Adrienne Kelso (centre) is surrounded by family in friends as they all take part in the Walk to End ALS in WIlliams Lake on June 19. Kelso was diagnosed with ALS during the summer of 2020. (Photo submitted)Adrienne Kelso (centre) is surrounded by family in friends as they all take part in the Walk to End ALS in WIlliams Lake on June 19. Kelso was diagnosed with ALS during the summer of 2020. (Photo submitted)
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted

Organizers of the annual Walk to End ALS in Williams Lake were thankful to be able to host an in-person event last month on Saturday, June 19 in Boitanio Park.

Forty-three people joined together in solidarity to show their support for those suffering with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), and to help fundraise for a cure.

Front and centre at this year’s Williams Lake walk was Adrienne Kelso, a 36-year-old wife and mother of two girls, who was diagnosed with ALS during the summer of 2020.

And while the weather didn’t co-operate as planned, participants and the community have already banded together to raised upwards of $12,000, with more local fundraising events coming up in the future.

READ MORE: Williams Lake family focuses on ‘the now’ after devastating ALS diagnosis

Leo Rankin, one of the event’s organizers who got involved fundraising for the ALS Society of BC after his brother, Ron Rankin, passed away from the disease in 2009, said he truly hopes some headway can be made in finding a cure for the devastating disease, which robs individuals of their ability to move, speak and breathe. The disease causes the brain to no longer be able to communicate with the muscles of the body.

ALS is often difficult to diagnose as it mimics symptoms from many other illnesses.

“They really need to get a better handle on what’s going on,” Rankin said.

“That’s why I’m involved. It would be so great if they would at least be able to get a handle on it right away.”


 


greg.sabatino@wltribune.com

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