Dennis Hawkins-Bogle (from left), Stephen Hawkins-Bogle, a married couple visiting from Mcleese Lake, break bread beside longtime Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple member Mohan Gill. Patrick Davies Photo.

VIDEO: Flag raised for Vaisakhi in Williams Lake

Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple is celebrating Vaisakhi in style this weekend

Vaisakhi celebrations took place last weekend in Williams Lake at the Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple.

Vaisakhi, otherwise known as Punjabi new year, is an important event for Sikh and Hindu communities worldwide and is celebrated annually on April 13 and 14. Here in Williams Lake, Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple did so by inviting the entire public out to their flag changing ceremony.

Read More: SLIDESHOW: Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple raises the flag during Vaisakhi in Williams Lake

Every year for Vaisakhi the temple changes out its flag covering to wash so they can refresh the pole and prepare it for the next 365 days. Afterwards, attendees celebrate with a traditional meal in the temple.

Throughout the weekend starting at 8 a.m. Friday morning and ending at 10 a.m. Sunday morning the Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh holy book, was read continuously to mark the occasion.

Mohan Gill is a longtime member of the temple who’s lived and worked in Williams Lake for 25 years and said that it’s important for this event to be open to everyone to come and celebrate, regardless of faith.

“Everyone is welcome here (at the temple),” Gill said.



patrick.davies@wltribune.com

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Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple members Ternjit Dhesi (back left) and Rachhpal Sahota serve food in the temple during this year’s Vaisakhi. Every year the Sahota family donates the food for the celebrations.

LEFT: Members of the Panj Pyare, the Five Beloved Ones, chant during Vaisakhi celebrations Saturday in Williams Lake.

Members of the Sikh community come together to wrap the flag pole in a special cloth designed to last throughout the year. Patrick Davies Photo.

Patrick Davies photos Members of the Sikh community come together to wrap the flag pole in a special cloth designed to last throughout the year.

Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple members draw their ceremonial swords as the temple’s newly changed flag is raised into the sky. Patrick Davies Photo.

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