Rose Dickens (left) and Shirley Pehota check out the quilts.

Rose Dickens (left) and Shirley Pehota check out the quilts.

Third World Baby Shower a big hit

The Third World Baby Shower was a huge success that the community can be proud of, says Marie Vautour who initiated the project.

The Third World Baby Shower was a huge success that the community can be proud of, says Marie Vautour who initiated the project with the Evangelical Free Church on 11th Avenue.

“The Williams Lake community donated more than 300 pieces of clothing, 180 receiving blankets and quilts, 41 handmade flannelette diapers, and 10 hooded towels/facecloths,” Vautour says.

“The amount of baby needs collected has been amazing,” Vautour says.

“When I hosted this event in Kelowna we had approximately the same amount donated and Kelowna is much bigger than Williams Lake so congrats to the community for a job well done.”

Over the past few months, Vautour says many people in the community donated new baby items and many others spent countless hours with their knitting and crocheting needles and sewing machines, making baby clothes, quilts and cloth diapers by hand. One woman donated a hand woven blanket, Vautour says.

“Thank you to all those who put hours of love into their works of art. They will make a difference in the lives of the families they reach.”

Vautour initiated the Third World Baby Shower a couple of months ago by highlighting reports from missionaries that many babies in developing countries go home wrapped in newspapers because their families are so poor that they can’t afford cloth clothes or blankets.

The project wrapped up Saturday, April 2 with a Third World Baby Shower and Tea held at the church during which all of the items were displayed for the community to see.

A  dedication ceremony was also held at the church on Sunday before the collection was sent this week to Canada Food for the Children for distribution.

She expects that most of the items will go to needy families in South American countries but can’t know for sure where they will go.

“Unfortunately I don’t know where the items will be going, wherever the need is greatest, Vautour says.

“Thanks again for the coverage in the paper.”