Kira Pooni, Baljit Sangra, Salakshana Pooni, Jeeti Pooni and the Williams Lake Film Club’s Patricia Weber prepare for the viewing of Because We are Girls in Williams Lake at Paradise Cinemas. (Greg Sabatino photo)

Kira Pooni, Baljit Sangra, Salakshana Pooni, Jeeti Pooni and the Williams Lake Film Club’s Patricia Weber prepare for the viewing of Because We are Girls in Williams Lake at Paradise Cinemas. (Greg Sabatino photo)

That’s a wrap: Williams Lake Film Club finishes another season

“This time of uncertainty has given us the opportunity to reflect on the importance of cinema”

Submitted by the Williams Lake Film Club

The Williams Lake Film Club would like to thank all those who came out to our screenings this past fall and winter season!

Here’s a recap of what was an exciting and diverse year: we began in September getting our hands dirty with the inspiring documentary Biggest Little Farm by John Chester, followed in November by a charming period piece, All is True, by Kenneth Branagh, about Shakespeare’s retirement years.

In November, we partnered with the Paradise Cinemas as well as the National Film Board of Canada and sold out two screenings of Baljit Sangra’s documentary Because We Are Girl at the Paradise Cinemas, where three sisters raised in Williams Lake take their childhood abuser to court.

Ticket sales were donated to Chiwid Transition House.

In December we viewed the Lulu Wang’s poignant film The Farewell, about a Chinese American family dealing with a cancer diagnosis, and in January we brought in South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite, which went on to win four Oscars at the Academy Awards.

In February, we viewed Pedro Almodóvar Pain and Glory, a nuanced and personal story of remembrance and reconciliation, and also celebrated the Oscars with a viewing party in support of the Williams Lake Salvation Army Food Bank (thanks to Mr. Mikes for hosting and the Open Book and Bean Counter Bistro for door prizes). Our screening in March was Zacharias Kunuk’s One Day in the Life of Noah Piaguttuk, a powerful film about colonization in Northern Canada in the 1960s. We’d also like to thank the Williams Lake Pride Society for providing the concession at our events.

Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and subsequent closure of events, we are regretfully unable to screen our last selection of the season, Céline Sciamma’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire, a tale of forbidden love in 18th century France.

However, we will be back next fall with a new roster of films that showcase the best in cinema from Canada and across the world.

This time of upheaval and uncertainty has given us the opportunity to reflect on the importance of cinema in particular, and art in general. We believe film to be an incredible artistic medium that reflects our personal struggles, allows us to examine our personal and cultural beliefs, and provides the opportunity for the exploration of ideas.

Film sparks off conversations, brings communities together, and allows us to connect with one another.

During these stressful times we are currently posting to our Facebook page film recommendations to keep you occupied during isolation (www.facebook.com/WilliamsLakeFilmClub).

To find out about new screenings in the fall, send an e-mail to williamslakefilmclub@gmail.com to be added to the mail out. Stay healthy and see you all in the fall!


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